Economic and political perspectives on HIV

Economic and political perspectives on HIV - Economic and...

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Economic and political perspectives on HIV/AIDS in Developing Countries 1. Poverty impacts on AIDS a. Potential impacts on HIV via sexual health or risk behaviors i. Don’t know about prevention ii. No HIV test iii. No condoms iv. Untreated cofactor illness b. Other pathways i. Poor more likely to have poor nutrition or health c. Hardest hit countries are poor countries (i.e. Africa) i. But, HIV prevalence it highest in more wealthy African countries (south  africa) ii. Surveys suggest that there is a positive association between HIV  prevalence and wealth. 1. Doubt about estimates. Data can come from hospitals which are  available to more wealthy citizens. 2. Wealthy individuals are more likely to have more than one partner. iii. Better off in poor countries 1. Can afford more sexual partners (having multiple partners is a  “normal” good) 2. Are more mobile geographically 3. HIV prevalence is higher in urban areas, which are wealthier.
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This note was uploaded on 09/29/2008 for the course NS 2060 taught by Professor Stoltzfus,r. during the Spring '08 term at Cornell.

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Economic and political perspectives on HIV - Economic and...

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