5 Habitual Bipedalism and Hand Precision Grip

5 Habitual Bipedalism and Hand Precision Grip - Habitual...

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Habitual Bipedalism and Hand Precision Grip (5) Comparative Skeletal Anatomy of Humans vs Extant Apes w/ Regard to Bipedalism Posture and length of limbs: Human spine shock absorbing double-S curvature Human legs longer than arms Articulation b/w skull and spine- foramen magnum- central pos in humans Pelvis: Short and wide in humans, long and narrow in non-human primates Center of mass closer to hip joint- upright posture Outlet larger, especially in females Femur, tibia, fibula, knee joint: Knee joint can lock in extended position Valgus angle allows human to center body weight over 1 foot, other in motion Feet: Non-human primates, flexible grasping organs, abductible great toe, like hands Human tarsals, metatarsals bound by tendons- arched platform Human first toe- strong, non-abductible, non-opposable- push-off Fuctional Anatomy of Pelvis, Femur and Gluteus Muscles Stance phase- pelvis tilts down on unsupported side- counteracted by gluteus medius and minimus- abductors in humans, extensors in apes
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This note was uploaded on 09/29/2008 for the course BIO 346 taught by Professor Kalthoff during the Spring '07 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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5 Habitual Bipedalism and Hand Precision Grip - Habitual...

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