Oct17_Personality_Preferences_Chap4

Oct17_Personality_Preferences_Chap4 - l . “W cunerua } ....

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Unformatted text preview: l . “W cunerua } . Personality Preferences Exploring Your E i hroughout this book you have already explored your values, 1 Uniqueness skills and interests. However, in order to fully evaluate your major and career options, we believe it could be essential for you to explore your personality type. For some people gaining insight to their natural personality preferences and strengths can be crucial to their comfort with making decisions. If you can focus your energy in areas in which you are already naturally gifted you will not have to learn about yourself in retrospect, but rather gain direction to ex- ploring your options. l _: i “To thine own self When you have a greater understanding of What motivates you, then b t ,, 6 rue. you can make better choices about your major and career, as well as know how to use your natural drives and strengths. By having a better understanding of yourself you can use the strategies that best work for you when adjusting to the ever-changing world around us and identifying areas of personal growth. Learning about your per- sonality preferences could help you to accept yourself for who you are; appreciate what you have to offer; and in the end heighten your career satisfaction (Dunning, 2001). Ultimately, understanding your personality preferences can assist you in clarifying what makes you happy in many facets of your life. “William Shakespeare If you have never explored your personality preferences, this chap- ter can help you iearn powerful information about yourself, year preferences and your choices in life. If you are already acquainted with the theory of Personality Type, this chapter could help you to further explore your preferences and consider how these affect your career and personal choices. Important Note: This chapter is not meant to be a substitute for the actual Myers-Briggs Type indicator® (MBTI®), but an introduction to personality type and a supplement to the interpretation of your MBTI report. We encourage you to contact your career develop- ment center to inquire about the administration and interpretation of the MBTI® by a qualified counselor. How It All Began The concept of personality preferences stems from Swiss psycho— analyst Carl Jung’s Personality Type theory (lung, 1921). Although a very powerful in content, Jung’s writings on this subject were com- eaentreeseennot;eeenaeeeeeoeeeeoeeeeaeoeeeaseseaenaeoeoneneeeoeoaeeeee _ -_ Charting Your Career Path plicated for readers without education or experi— ence in psychoanalysis, making it difficult for the general public to understand or apply his classifi— cation of different personality types. In the early 1940s, Katharine Briggs and Isabel Briggs—Myers (mother and daughter) researched Carl Jung’s Personality Type theory in the United States to create an instrument that could allow any— one to understand and apply Personality Type theory. They developed the Myers—Briggs Type Indicator® (MBTI) and tested it for over 40 years for statistical reliability and validity, eventually publishing it in the 19703. Their goal was to help people better understand themselves and others (Myers, 1998). The Myers—Briggs Type lndicator® is an instrument designed to categorize individual responses to a user—friendly psychological questionnaire into one of 16 different personality types. Each personality type is defined by our unique preferences in four different indicators: our focus of attention, our style of perception, our decision—making style, and our need of order (Myers, 1985). Throughout this chap— ter you can explore and estimate your preferences for each of these indicators and how they influ- ence your personal choices. Understanding the Concept of Preferences To understand the focus of the theory of Personal— ity Type, please try the following exercise: When you are finished, place your pen in your other hand and in the space provided write your name again. 44 What was different between writing with one hand versus the other? What differences can you iden— tify in your level of comfort, skill, and concentra— tion, or in your speed, outcome, and self—awareness? Using your preferred hand is natural, comfortable and effortless. However, using your other hand is most likely awkward, less skilled, and requires more concentration. You have just experienced a perfect example of a preference. Well, just like handwriting, the Personality Type theory stems from the premise of preferences (Myers, 1998). More than likely you did not make a conscious choice about which hand you would use to write with today; or if you were asked when you de— cided to write with one hand versus the other, you might not remember. This is because there are ele— ments of your writing~hand preference which are inborn and thus you do not control. Likewise, some aspects of your personality preferences are inborn and therefore out of your control (Myers, 1998). Additionally, if something were to happen to the hand with which you naturally write, you could continue functioning. You might even develop skills or an interest in writing with your other hand, thus writing “out of type.” Similarly, even though you may have clear personality preferences, often you might choose to behave “out of type.” You can even develop a skill or an interest in a preference other than yours. This behavior is normal and does not undermine your preferences (Myers, 1998). Finally, writing with one hand versus the other does not make you a better or worse person. A writing— hand preference simply makes you different. In the same way your personality preferences are never right or wrong, they are simply different. It is there- fore important to remember that personality type classification always refers to healthy diversity (Myers, 1998). Understanding the Four Indicators Imagine that a bird flew into your room right now. Think of the pattern of information processing you would follow: 1. First, you might realize that something is flying in your room, thus calling your attention to it. .. #fimu—AAW _ yhartt'nghi’our Career Path 2. Then you might try to perceive it is, whether a threatening objector a non-threaten— ing bird. 3. Third, you might make a judgment on its rel— evance, whether to keep your attention on the bird or move to something else. 4. Finally, you might order and store this informa- tion in your mind as an example of information processing. Notice how you more than liker process informa- tion through a pattern of attention, perception, judg- ment and order. Comparably, your personality is reflected on how you process information, and thus the MBTI® de- termines your personality type by expioring the combination of your preferences in the following four indicators (Myers, 1985): 1. Energy drive or focus of attention 2. Perception style 3. Decisionwmaking style 4. Need of order Remember that even though we all have a prefer» ence, we can often operate out of our natural prefn erences or act “out of type.” This means that someone with a particular preference can develop skilis, or even an interest, in the opposite prefer» ease, or vice versa. First Indicator: Energy Drive or Focus of Attention Our focus of attention, or our energy drive, deter— mines our first personality preference. We all have a preference for focusing our attention or energiz- ing ourselves either outwardly or inwardly. The Myers~Briggs Type Indicatorfi9 refers to this di— chotomy as a preference for Extraversion (E) or Introversion (I) (Myers, 1985). details and data or possibilities and associatioas. . . . The M er — r' T e d'cator® refers to this T he way we perceive thmgs degenmnes our 860— . y S B lggs yp IE 1 . dlchotomy as a preference for Sensmg (S) or Intw 0nd personality preference. We all haw: a prefer— . . ence for how we gather information either through men (N) (Myers’ 1985)' Second Indicator: Perception Style Indiana University Career Developmcm ngge Third Indicator: DecisiomMaking Style The way we make decisions determines our third personality preference. We all have a paceferenee for how we make decisions either based on logic Charting Your Career Path and analysis or based on values and empathy. The Myers-Briggs Type Indieator® refers to this di— chotomy as a preference for Thinking (T) or Fee}- ing (F) (Myers, 1985). Fourth Indicator: Need of Order raneizy. The Myers—Briggs Type Indicator® refers to this dichotomy as a preference for Judgment (J) Our need of order determrnes our fourth personal— of Perception (P) (Myers, 1985} ity preference. We all have a preference either for structure and planning or for flexibility and spam Verifying Type If estimating your preferences has been difficult for you, please remember that you can and might often operate “out of type.” However, you stilt have a preference, which accommodates you better and makes you more comfortabie than its opposite. Remember the handwriting exercise. You can verify your personality preferences and We suggest that you compare your selfwestimated type by explming the f0110Wifigi type Withthe. reported typ@e you receiye once you 1. Read Carefully your type description and deter- have Completed the MBTI ' Keep 1“ mind that you mine whether you identify with the information can disagree With youI reported type" about your type. Table 5.1 provides brief descrip- H—uu AA kmmwwm “H” a l ! 5' - ‘filndiana University Career Development Center “liable 5.1 Characteristics Frequently Associated with Each Personality Type Sensing intuitive 4‘ 7 PINE} Seek meaning and connec‘ tion in ideas, relationships, and material possessions. Want to understand what motivates people and are insightful about others. Conscientious and commit- ed to their firm values. Develop a clear vision about how best to serve the common good. Orga- EST] Quiet, serious, earn success by thoroughness and dependability. Practical, matter-of—iact, realistic, and responsible. Decide logically what should be done and work toward it steadily, regardless of distractions. Take pleasure in making everything orderly and organized—their work, is” Quiet, friendly, responsible, and conscientious. Commit» ted and steady in meeting their obligations. Thorough, painstaking, and accurate. Loyal, considerate, notice and remember specifics about people who are imw portant to them, concerned with how others feel. Strive to create an orderly and INT] Have original minds and great drive for implement— ing their ideas and achieving their goats. Quickly see patw terns in external events and develop long-range explana- tory perspectives. When committed, organize a gob and carry it though. Skepti- cal and independent, have high standards of compe- 5 their home, their life. harmonious environment nizecl and decisive in imple~ tence and performance—- '§ Value traditions and ioyaity. at work and at home. menting their vision. for themselves and others. in § :51? [SW INFP our *5 Tolerant and flexible; quiet Quiet, friendly, sensitive, idealistic, loyal to their val— Seek to develop logical "'“‘ observers untii a problem and kind. Enjoy the present ues and to people who are explanations for everything appears, then act quickly to moment, what’s going on important to them. Want that interests them. Theou find workabie solutions. around them. Like to have an external life that is con- retical and abstract, inter- Analyze what makes things their own space and to groom with their values. ested more in ideas than work and readily get work within their own time Curious, quick to see possi~ in social interaction. Quiet, through large amounts of frame. loyal and committed bilities, can be catalysts for contained, flexible, and data to isolate the core of to their values and to peo— implementing ideas. Seek to adaptable. Have unusual practical problems. Enter— ple who are important to understand people and to ability to focus in depth to ested in cause and effect, them. Dislike disagreements help them fulfill their poten- solve problems in their area organize facts using logical and conflicts, do not force tlal. Adaptable, flexibie, and of interest. Skeptical, somew principies, value efficiency. their opinions or values on accepting, unless a value is times critical, always others. threatened. anaiytical. ESTP ESFP ENFP ENTP Flexible and tolerant, they Outgoing, friendiy, and Warmly enthusiastic and Quick, ingenious, stimulating, take a pragmatic approach accepting. Exuberant lovers imaginative. See life as iull of alert and outspoken. focused on immediate of life, peopie, and material possibilities. Make connec- Resourceful in solving new resuits. Theories and comforts. Enjoy working tions between events and and challenging probierns. conceptual explanations with others to make things information very quickly, Adept at generating cons bore them~they want to happen. Bring common and confidently proceed ceptuai possibilities and act energetically to soive sense and a realistic ap- based on the patterns they then analyzing them strate- the probiem. Focus on the proach to their work, and see. Want a lot oi altirma» gically. Good at reading here-and—now, spontaneous, make work fun. Flexibie and tion from others, and read— other people. Eored by enjoy each moment that spontaneous, adapt readily ily give appreciation and routine, will seldom do the they can be active with to new people and environv support. Spontaneous and same thing the same way, others. Enjoy material com" ments. Learn best by trying a flexible, often rely on their apt to turn to one new : forts and style. Learn best new skill with other people. ability to improvise and interest after another. cg through doing. their verbal fluency. a a 12er rsri ENFJ ENT! *3 Practical, realistic, matter—of~ Warmhearteci, conscientious, Warm, empathetic, respon- Frank, decisive, assume Lu fact. Decisive, quickly move to implement decisions. Organize projects and people to get things done. Focus on getting results in the most efficient way pos- sible. Take care of routine details. Have a clear set of iogical standards, systemati- cally foiiow them and want others to also. Forceful in implementing their plans. and cooperative. Want harmony in their environment, work with determination to establish it. Like to work with others to complete tasks accurately and on time. Loyal, iollow through even in small matters. Notice what others need in their day-hy~day lives and try to provide it. Want to be appreciated for who they are and for what they contribute. slve, and responsible. Highly attuned to the emotions, needs, and motivations of others. Find potential in everyone, want to help others fulfill their potential. May act as catalysts for individual and group growth. Loyal, responsive to'praise and criticism. Sociable, facilitate others in a group, and provide inspir— ing leadership. ieadership readily. Quickly see illogical and inefficient procedures and policies. Develop and implement comprehensive systems to solve organizationai problems. Enjoy long-term planning and goal setting. Usually well informed, well read, enjoy expanding their knowledge and passing it on to others. Forceful in presenting their ideas. l Modified and reproduced by special permission of the Publisher, Consulting Psychologists Press, inc, Palo Alto, CA 94303 from introduction to Typefi’, 6’“ Edition, page 13 by lsabel Briggs Myers. Copyright 1998, by Consulting l _ Psychologists Press, inc. All rights reserved. Further reproduction is prohibited without the Publisher’s written consent. 49 Charting Your CoreenEath. tions of each type. HOWever, we encourage you to read the descriptions found in the suggested readings, or in your college career library, to gain an in-depth understanding of your type descrip~ tion. 2. Read alternative type descriptions and compare them to yours. 3. Reflect on your past eXperience and behavior to match it with your type descriptors. 4. Participate in group exercises with people of similar types to further explore your match. 5. Have others who know you well, such as rela- tives or close friends, give you feedback. 6. Monitor your behavior and its personality type match over time (Myers, 1998). Another key strategy to verifying your personality type is exploring your “personality functions.” Our type is not only the sum of our preferences from the four indicators but also a dynamic relationship between them. It is this unique relationship that distinguishes the 16 personality types. When we refer to “personaiity function” we are focusing on the middle two preferences: our perception style, Sensing or iNtuitive, and our decision—making style, Thinking or Feeling. The combination of these two preferences (NF, SF, NT or ST) includes a dominant function and an auxiliary function. Each of these functions we display either in our exteru nal or internal world, in Extraversion or I ntrover— sion. (A tertiary function and an inferior function also exist, but this chapter wiil focus on the domi— nant and auxiliary functions only.) These concepts are complex. To further understand them refer to suggested readings at the end of this chapter. Table 5.2 Priorities of Functions IST} Sensing (dominant) m I Thinking (auxiliary) — E Feeling (tertiary) ——— E/I intuition (inferior) — E ISTP Thinking {dominant} —— I Sensing (auxiliary) m E intuition (tertiary) ~— E/l Feeling (inferior) —~ E EST? Sensing (dominant) ~— E Thinking (auxiliary) —1 Feeling (tertiary) -—— E/l intuition (inferior) - I EST] Thinking (dominant) — E Sensing (auxiliary) ——-E Intuition (tertiary) — E/l 6 Feeling (inferior) ml lSF} Sensing (dominant) m» I Feeltng (auxiliary) ——- E Thinking (tertiary) —— E/l Intuition (inferior) — E ISEP Feeling (dominant) —-t Sensing (auxiliary) — E Intuition (tertiary) w E/I Thinking (inferior) —- E ESE? Sensing (dominant) —— E Feeling (auxiliary) —— I Thinking (tertiary) -- E/i intuition (inferior) —— l ESH Feeling (dominant) m E Sensing (auxiliary) ——l Intuition (tertiary) ——— E/l Thinking (inferior) — I tNF] Intuition (dominant) _—~ I Feeling (auxiliary) —— E Thinking (tertiary) - E/I Sensing (inferior) — E - INFP Feeling (dominant) ~.— I Intuition (auxiliary) —-~ E Sensing (tertiary) w» E/l Thinking (inferior) — E ENFP Intuition (dominant) ~— E Feellng (auxiliary) ——l Thinking (tertiary) mm E/I Sensing (inferior) — I ENE] Feeling (dominant) w- E intuition (auxiliary) —— I Sensing (tertiary) —— E/I Thinking (inferior) ——l INT] Intuition (dominant) —— | Thinking (auxiliary) --— E Feeling (tertiary) "~— E/l Sensing (inferior) - E INTP Thinking (dominant) —l Intuition (auxiliary) —— E Sensing (tertiary) —— (5/! Feeling (inferior) m E ENTP Intuition (dominant) w» E Thinking (auxiliary) —i Feeling (tertiary) —— Ell Sensing (inferior) m | ENT] Thinking (dominant) —— E intuition (auxiliary) ——— ! Sensing (tertiary) —-~ [2/] Feeling (inferior) ml E = Extraverted, I m introverted, E/l = Theorists differ on the orientation of the tertiary. Modified and reproduced by specialpermission of the Publisher; Consulting Psychologists Press, Inc, PaloAth; CA 94303 from Manual: A guide to the development and use of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicated”, page 33' by lsabel Briggs Myers. Copyright 1998, by Consulting Psychologists Press, Inc. All rights reserved. Further reproduction is prohibited without the Publisher’s written consent. 50 indiana University CaregLDeyeiopment Center If you have a preference for Extraversion, you ex~ press your dominant function in outward behav» ior. If you have a preference for Introyictsion, you express your dominant function in your internal mental processing. On the other hand, your auxil— iary function supports the dominant and is dis— played internally if your dominant is displayed externally, and vice-verse. These functions signifi- cantly assist us in making choices in life. Find your type in Table 5.2, and consider your dominant func— tion and whether you display this function exter~ nally or internally. Then consider your auxiliary function and whether you display this function externally or internally. Do you identify with your dominant and auxiliary functions? To assist you in verifying your personality type, study your type functions in Table 5.2, and try to determine whether they match you. Using Type in Your Career Isabel Myers’ earliest goal for the MBTI‘E was to help people choose careers that would match their preferences and personality strengths (Martin, 1995). Once you have estimated your preferences, you can apply what you have learned about the MBTI® and your particular personality type by exploring careers that could make use of your pref- erences and personality strengths. There have been some notable type-related patterns in career choice. The personality function pairs have significant importance for career selection (see Table 5.3), while your preference on the Eli and NP indica~ tors are closely related to work satisfaction (Myers H 1998). Myers and McCaulley (1985) stated, “When there is a mismatch between type and occupation, the client usually reports feeling tired and inadequate. According to type theory, the mismatch causes fa— tigue because it is more tiring to use less-preferred processes. A mismatch also causes discourage ment, because despite the greater expenditure of effort, the work product is less likely to show the quality of products that would be developed if the preferred processes were utilized. Tasks that call on preferred and developed processes require less effort for better performance and give more satis- faction.” We caution you not to use personality type as your only basis for career choice. Make sure to include your values, skills, and interests in your decision, and keep in mind that all occupations include and could benefit from a diversity of types. No one type is mutually exclusive to a particular career. As Isabel Myers (1998) indicated, “Each person has access to all eight preferences and . . . many occu- pations also require the use of all eight, at least some of the time.” Mutual Usefulness of Opposite Iypes As you interact with others, you will notice a vari— ety of personality preferences, types, and functions. This diversity of contrasting personality types of- ten presents significant challenges that require stra— Table 5.3 Typical Fields of Study or Work by Preference Combinations ST SF NF Management/business Health care Accounting/banking Teaching Law enforcement Engineering Religious service Office work Skilled trades Community service NT Counseling/human services Law Art and music Writing/journalism Behayioral science Education Physical science Computers Management Research Modified and reproduced by special permission of the Publisher, Consulting Psychologists Press, Inc, F’an Alto, CA 94303 from Introduction to Type and College, page 5 by john K. DItherIo, AIIen L. Hammer. Copyright 1998, by Consulting Psychologists Press, Inc. All rights reserved. Further reproduction Is prohibited without the Publisher’s written consent. Charting Your C oreer Path Table 5.4 Mutual Usefulness of Opposite Types Intuitive Types Can benefit from the natural inclination of Sensing types to Bring up pertinent facts Face the realities of the current situation Apply experience to solving problems Focus on what needs attention now Feeling Types Can benefit from the natural inclination of Thinking types to Analyze consequences and implications Hold consistently to a poiicy Stand firm for important principles Create rational systems Be fair Sensing Types Can benefit from the natural inclination of intuitive types to Bring up new possibilities Anticipate future trends Apply insight to solving problems Focus on long-term goals 'fhinking lypes Can benefit from the natural inclination of Feeling types to Forecast how others will react and feel Make needed individual exceptions Stand firm for humanucenterecl values Organize people and tasks harmoniously Appreciate the Thinking type along with everyone else Modified and reproduced by special permission of the Publisher, Consulting Psychologists Press, Inc., Pa lo Alto, CA 94303 from introduction to Type‘19 6’” Edition, page 30 by lsabel Briggs Myers. Copyright 1998, by Consulting Psycholo— gists Press, inc. All rights reserved. Further reproduction is prohibited without the Publisher’s written consent. tegic team building and collaboration efforts from all members of a group. Once you become aware of your personality type and those of others, you can explore how Opposite types can complement each other. Eventually group and team members can realize that Sensing preferences can complcw ment Intuition preferences and vicc~versa, and that Thinking preferences can complement Feeling preferences and vice—versa, in a wide diversity of tasks and activities. Review Table 5.4 to further explore how opposite types can complement each other in most mutual undertakings (Myers, 1998). Suggested Readings Dunning, Donna. (2001). What’s Your Type of Career? Palo Alto: Davies—Black Publishing. 52 Demarest, Larry. (1997). Looking at Type in the Workplace. Palo Alto: Consulting Psychologists Press, Inc. Ditibcrio, John K. and Hammer, Allen L. (1993). Introduction to Type in College. Palo Alto: Con— sulting Psychologists Press, Inc. Hammer, Allen L. (1993). Introduction to Type and Careers. Palo Alto: Consulting Psychologists Press, Inc. Martin, Charles. (1995). Looking or Type and Careers. Palo Alto: Consulting Psychologists Press, Inc. Tieger, P. 1)., Barron—Tieger, B. (2001). Do What You Are. Boston: Little, Brown, and Company. TypeLogic: http://www.izypelogiccom i 2 l i s i l l l e t z. 'i .sussiwa‘w._,._=....c.._..,.... . ..4v...,_u..u. Making the Connections he chapters preceding this page have allowed you to take some time to evaluate your needs in terms of your values, skills, interests, and personality preferences. By now you have begun to reflect on your values in regards to how they fit a work environ— ment, identifying at least five that you consider as essential in your work life. We have worked to assist you in discovering your skiils through a few reflective exercises. You have identified a list of inter— ests that are important to you that will play a key role in determining what you want to spend your time doing in your career. You have also explored your personality preferences and have identified some occupations that will help you begin exploring a good fit. And, finally, you have explored your decision—making style and have realized that a systematic approach is the best way to narrow your choices. During the course of your life, you will continue to re—evaluate these needs, and as you have different experiences, your needs will change, and you will have a greater understanding of your self—concept. The exercise in this section will allow you to see how your values, inter« ests, skills, and personality preferences come together to determine a good fit in the occupation of your choice. Making the connections between your career components and the career options you are considering will help you narrow your op— tions and find a good fit. It is essential that you thoroughly under— stand ail that will be expected of you in your career choice. You may find that one of the careers you are considering does not match your own values, skills, or interests. This may be difficult for you to re- alize, but it is best to come to‘ this under— standing now rather than later. The next couple of chapters in this book will guide you through the pro— , cess of researching specific information on the careers you are considering. This particular piece of the pro" cess is especially helpful. Charting Your Career Path erase-engeneranoaeoeaeeeeeeeeeoeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeuneeeeeeeeeeeneeeeeeesueeeeeen Summary Exercise “Writing fiction has developed in me a sense of Where to look for the threads, how to follow, how to connect, find in the thick of the tangle What clear line persists. The strands are all there . . .” —Eudam Wig; Choose an occupation you are considering and complete the following exercise. Use the books in your library to find descriptions or the on-line sources provided by your career counselor or in~ structor. The following resource is especially helpful and easy to use: (Occupational Outlook Handbook (2002). Electronic Version: http://stats.bls.gov/oco/ocoiab.htm) Directions: Write the name of an occupation you are considering as a career goal. Estimate the work values a person in this career would have according to their job tasks. Use the same descrip~ tion to list the skills that will be used in this position. Assign a Holland Theme Code and MBTI® type and to this occupation based on the description given in career books. Be sure to pay close attention to the reasons that you are assigning a personality type and Holland code to this particu~ lar occupation. Finally, justify your estimates by giving reasons for each code, type, skill, and value. Title of Occupation: mum—W Values (Use Work Values List): Reasons: (Use the Skills list from the skills chapter in this book or the Skillscan ProfileTM): Reasons: numb—ww— WWWW‘MWhJ - Jndi-anafiniversity Career Development Center alien Codes from Chapter 3 or the Strong Interest Inventory): (RIASEC) Letter Codes Reasons: EorI SorN Tor? JorP Reasons: EorI SorN MB (Use the MBTI type letters from Chapter 4): TGIF I or P t ._ _ .. —_—___ 57 Charting Your Career Path -- - In the box below, list your own values, skills, interests, and personality preferences. Refer to chapters 1—4 in this book to fill in the information below. After filling out the textbox with your personal information, write a summary below the box'that describes you best. For Example: I enjoy working with others, helping others, instructing, and guiding. I enjoy cre— ative ways of helping others and solving problems. I am good at the following things: reading, organizing events, drawing, singing, sports. I like activities that involve teams and sports. I enjoy art in the form of music and crafts. I gain my energy from others and take in information through my senses. I like gathering the details and prefer that information is given to me in chronological order. Intake decisions based on how it will affect the people around me. I enjoy planning ahead and try to be organized in everything I do. My Personal Career Profile: My Work Values: My Skills: My Holland Theme Code (Interests): My Personality Preferences (MBTI): Personal Summary: i -. Compare the career components of the career you researched with your own profile. List the reasons Why your career components (values, skills, interests, and personality preferences) align with your career goal. What areas do not align well and Why? My Potential. Career Goal. (Title of Occupation): Reasons Why my persooal career components align with my potential career goal: Areas that do not align well with my potential career goal: ...
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