NR 510 week 1, 1 - There are four different areas of nursing with a specialty in advanced practice registered nurses(APRNs that Mary can choose from

NR 510 week 1, 1 - There are four different areas of...

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There are four different areas of nursing with a specialty in advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) that Mary can choose from based on her nursing experience and background. A better understanding of the pros and cons of each nursing specialty roles and responsibilities might encourage Mary to make the appropriate decision. The four recognized roles that the APRNs usually practice includes clinical nurse specialty (CNS), certified nurse practitioner (CNP), Certified nurse-midwife (CNM), and certified registered nurse anesthesia (CRNA). Although, the primary objective of all advanced practice registered nurses is the provision of direct patient care using sound critical thinking with a decision-making process that is supported by evidence-based practice (DeNisco & Baker, 2015). The roles of each advanced practice registered nurses vary slightly or overlap each other, but they all work to deliver optimal patient care with excellent patient satisfaction. All advanced practice registered nurses are required to take the five general basic courses before heading toward their specific specialty. The pros and cons of each nursing specialty offers a quick look into the expectation from the four Advanced Practice Nursing possibilities: The clinical nurse specialist (CNS) is an advanced clinician with a master degree or doctorate that specialized in nursing practice to provide both direct and indirect patient care that influence optimal outcomes delivery. The CNS embrace all the core competencies in their nursing practice including expert consultation, nurses mentor leadership, educator, researchers, and ethical decision making (Foster & Flanders, 2014). Also, the clinical nurse specialist work in a various healthcare setting that are within the area of nursing practice including hospital, ambulatory, and clinics. The CNSs work collaboratively with other interdisciplinary healthcare providers to influence patient health outcomes delivery.
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They do not require physician supervision in most cases because they work mostly together with other healthcare providers. The CNSs have autonomy to practice based on their level of training in most states and does not require additional licensure after master’s degree except if he or she is seeking for prescription authority (Brassard & Thompkins, 2014). The CNSs work in many diverse area of nursing and adept the nursing practice across every setting.
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