wk6patho - Running head WK6 PATHO 1 wk6 patho April Matthews Walden University WK6 PATHO 2 wk6 patho Scenario 2 In this scenario a 6-year-old boy with

wk6patho - Running head WK6 PATHO 1 wk6 patho April...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 4 pages.

Running head: WK6 PATHO1wk6 pathoApril MatthewsWalden University
Background image
WK6 PATHO2wk6 pathoScenario 2In this scenario, a 6-year-old boy with an unknown vaccination history, complains of a “barking cough” for one week. While Croup usually affects children “between 6 months and 5 years of age with a peak incidence at 2 years of age” (Huether & McCance, 2017, p. 715). “Croup symptoms resolve in most children within 48 hours. However, a small percentage of children with croup have symptoms that persist for up to a week” (Johnson, 2016). This does notmean that older or younger children cannot get Croup. There are two types of Croup; acute laryngotracheobronchitis and spasmodic Croup. Most cases are caused by a viral infection. “Croup symptoms are often preceded by symptoms like those of an upper respiratory tract infection” (Johnson,2016). “Croup symptoms are most often worse at night and can fluctuate rapidly depending on whether the child is calm or agitated” (In order, to determine the severity ofthe croup its best to use the Westley Croup Score. In this case, it would be helpful to know if
Background image
Image of page 3

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 4 pages?

  • Spring '15
  • croup, Upper respiratory tract infection, spasmodic croup

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture