Schneiderman, B (2011) - Claiming Success, Charting the Future Micro-HCI and Macro-HCI

Schneiderman, B (2011) - Claiming Success, Charting the Future Micro-HCI and Macro-HCI

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Claiming Success, Charting the Future: Micro-HCI and Macro-HCI HCI’s value to academic colleagues or corporate managers. However, the larger world embraced our contribu- tions and now has high expectations for what we can deliver. Few fields can claim such rapid expansion and broad impact as the one responsible for the desktop, Web, and mobile interfaces now being used by bil- lions of people around the world. HCI designs now influence commercial success, reform education, change family life, and affect the political stability of nations. As HCI progresses, it’s gaining greater acceptance in the academic environment, where it is now part of computer science, iSchool, business, engineering, and other departments and has advocates in fields includ- ing medicine, the social sciences, journalism, and the humanities. While the term “human-computer interaction” has achieved widespread recognition, many insiders feel it is no longer accurate. They complain that it suggests one human interact- ing with one computer to complete narrow tasks. Instead, these critics believe that the discipline should reflect user-oriented technologies that are ubiquitous, pervasive, social, embedded, tangible, invisible, mul- timodal, immersive, augmented, or ambient. Some want to break free from the focus on computer use and emphasize areas such as user expe- rience, emotional impact, aesthetics, and social engagement. New terms have been proposed, such as human-centered computing, The remarkable growth of HCI over the past 30 years has transformed this once nascent interdisciplin- ary field into an intellectually rich, worldwide phenomenon. We’ve grown from a small, rebellious group of researchers who struggled to gain recognition as we broke disciplinary boundaries to a large, influential community with potent impact on the daily lives of people everywhere. The aspirations of early HCI researchers and practitioners were to make better menus tied to predictive models, design graphical user inter- faces based on direct manipulation, improve input devices in accordance with design space theories, design effective control panels that sup- ported task action models, and pres- ent information in comprehensible formats guided by cognitive theories.
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