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Book Review - American Indian Studies Book Review Women of...

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American Indian Studies Book Review- Women of the Dawn Christine Kostanski October 8, 2007 In an attempt to describe the lives of American Indian women ranging from the 1610’s to almost present day in the 1970’s, Women of the Dawn , written by Bunny McBride, outlines the lives four Wabanaki women throughout the European colonization in Eastern North America. The four women are all named “Molly” (they were baptized and given the name Mary, but the Wabanakis pronounce it “Molly”), and though they all lived at different times they all experience hard-ship and loss; through their own personal strengths and passions they managed to adapt to their new “American Indian-European” society while still staying true to their culture and heritage. The four women share many similar qualities besides their first names; all four have a very distinct role in their time and contribute greatly to the survival of their tribe. Each is a mother, with great love and hope for their children’s futures. Each woman is also fighting the colonization, and trying to keep the traditions of their people alive. Through their differences, McBride also attempts to shatter the stereotype that all of American Indian women were the same. The last Molly, Molly Dellis, narrates all four stories as she is doing research on the previous three. The book begins with the story of Molly Mathilde. She is the first to encounter Europeans in the mid 1600’s. Her father is the chief of the Wabanaki tribe so she has exposure to Europeans, mainly the French at an early age. Molly is praised for strengthening the ties between the French and the Wabanakis by her marriage to Jean Vincent de St. Castin. She is separated from her husband when he goes home to claim his inheritance and she is left to take care of her children alone. When Jean Vincent died they
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