NOTES-Week_1.docx - WEEK 1 ASSIGNMENT NOTES Lewis Hale A...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 6 pages.

WEEK 1 ASSIGNMENT NOTESLewis Hale: A middle-aged local farmer who visited the Wrights’ home and discovered Minnie calmly pleating her apron as her husband lay murdered in his bed. He accompanies Henderson and Peters, although not a legal authority, because of his firsthand account of the case. Mrs.Hale worries that her husband will reveal his tendency to “say unnecessary things” and make things more difficult for Minnie when telling the story of his discovery.Mrs. Peters: The wife of the sheriff who, in Mrs. Hale’s mind, does not look the part because she is “small and thin.” Mrs. Peters’ physical characteristics are reflected in her subservience to her husband, and tothe law, which she struggles to overcome. Mrs. Peters reminds Mrs. Hale of the men’s duties and their own responsibilities to the law, but she, ultimately, actively participates in the attempt to conceal the evidence of Minnie Wright’s guilt.Martha Hale: The wife of Mr. Hale and resident of the nearest farm to the Wrights’ home. Due to this proximity, as well as her acquaintance with the young Minnie Wright (when her name was Minnie Foster), Mrs.Hale feels immense responsibility for not having visited the married Minnie Wright in twenty years. Martha Hale is established as the protagonist of the story from the first few paragraphs. She is more strong-willed than Mrs. Peters (and is given a first name, unlike the other woman). She defies her husband and the law by concealing the
evidence against Minnie Wright, ultimately choosing to ally herself witha fellow woman against the patriarchal society in which they live.John Wright: The murdered man, and husband of Minnie Wright, whose death forms the backdrop for the events of the story. In the eyes of society, John Wright was respectable. He did not exhibit any of the traits that other men would frown upon such as drinking excessively or failing to pay his debts. Martha Hale, on the other hand, acknowledges the difficult aspects of John Wright’s personality, telling Mrs. Peters of his hardness, quietness, and the lonely life he would have given his wife. John Wright’s cruelty to Minnie is revealed even further over the course of the story.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture