Close Reading, Emily Bronte poem

Close Reading, Emily Bronte poem - October 1, 2006 The...

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October 1, 2006 The Night Wind Close Reading #3 All Things Living, Human or Not When one dies, they forever become a part of the Earth upon their burial. Or is it during life that humans are more intertwined with nature and their surrounding world? Emily Bronte makes a strong case that while we, as humans are alive, it is important for us to pay attention to the nature that surrounds us. After unsuccessfully trying to separate “human” feelings from the spirit of nature, the speaker in the poem The Night-Wind relents to the convincing words of the wind. Throughout the poem the speaker is communicates with the wind. The speaker attempts to fight the enticing words of the wind but cannot after she is made to recall the fact that throughout her life, the wind and nature have been very close to her. This aspect of the relationship is displayed when the wind is quoted in the eighth stanza saying, “Have we not been from childhood friends? Have I not loved thee long?” (99) At this point, Bronte reveals to the reader the depth of the speaker’s lifelong relationship with
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Close Reading, Emily Bronte poem - October 1, 2006 The...

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