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Organization of Respiratory System; Gas Laws-Lecture-1a

Organization of Respiratory System; Gas Laws-Lecture-1a -...

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Respiration Dr. Daniel Swartz Office: 227 Sherman Hall Phone: 829-2536 E-Mail: [email protected] Exam: October 13, 2008
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Expected: Read and know all material in CHAPTERS 17 and 18 . I will identify equations that you need to MEMORIZE . Do NOT be rude and inconsiderate during lectures. You will be responsible for ALL material if we cover it or not. I will ask if you have QUESTIONS , make appointment If you have additional questions. I will Identify KEY POINTS .
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Organization of Respiratory System – Gas Laws
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Figure 17-1 Four integrated processes: 1) Ventilation (breathing) - Inspiration - expiration 2) Exchange of O 2 and CO 2 between lungs and the blood. 3) Transport of O 2 and CO 2 in the blood. 4) Exchange of gases between blood and cells. Overview of Respiration
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Figure 17-2a Respiration Anatomy
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Figure 17-2b Thoracic Cage – bones and muscles (Skeletal muscle)
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Figure 17-2c
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Figure 17-2d Pleural Fluid = 3.0ml - Slippery surface - Holds lungs tight against thoracic wall (cohesiveness of water)
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Figure 17-3
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Figure 17-2 – Overview (1 of 2)
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Figure 17-2e Collapsible Airway
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Unformatted text preview: -Bronchioles-Respiratory Bronchioles -Alveoli Figure 17-4 Air Flow Velocity Decreases Figure 17-2f Cover 80-90% of alveolar surface Figure 17-2g Figure 17-2h Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells (VSMC) Type I Epithelial Cells - Covers 80 - 90% of alveoli Figure 17-2 – Overview (2 of 2) Pulmonary Blood Flow • Pulmonary blood volume = 0.5L (10% total) • Pulmonary capillary volume = 75 mL • Pulmonary blood pressure = 25/8 mmHg • Congestive Heart Failure (CHF) – Poor Left Ventricular Heart Function – Blood pools in pulmonary circulation – Increase pulmonary pressure – Pulmonary edema (Interstitial fluid) – Shortness of breath and blood in phlegm Table 17-1 Table 17-2 Partial Pressure of Gas Dalton’s Law • Partial pressure of a gas = P atm X % of gas in atmosphere. • Partial pressure of oxygen = 760 mmHg X 21%. • Po 2 = 760 X 0.21 = 160 mmHg. Boyles Law • P 1 V 1 = P 2 V 2 • 100mmHg X 1.0 L = 200mmHg X 0.5 L Figure 17-5...
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