hardware.ppt - hardware Thomas Krichel...

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hardware Thomas Krichel http://openlib.org/home/krichel
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introduction This is a basic introduction to computer hardware. I wrote it from memory. It contains the things I know about without having to look them up. That's about how much you need to know.
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basic components basic components are processor memory motherboard input/output devices disks network interfaces The first three, plus the bus speed, are essential to the understanding of the performance of the computer.
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processors The processor does all the calculations on a computer. The performance indicator of the processor is the frequency of operations. There are various types of processors, by different manufactures. Intel AMD
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architecture The Debian operating system offers a complete range of software that can be run with a range of processors by a certain manifactures. Such a range of software packages is called an architecture. We use the i386 architecture for Intel processors. AMD processors may be more open source friendly
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memory The memory is where all data that the computer works with is stored. If the memory is small the computer has to perform more operations to read and write data to the disk. As a consequence, it will appear to be slower.
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motherboard This is a green sheet of plastic that all components inside the computer attach to. We don't need to know more about it, just the plane concept will do.
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devices These are things that the computer uses for input and output of data. Examples include keyboard screen network card disks We only need to study disks and network cards.
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disks There are three architectures of disks IDE, aka PATA, an old system SCSI, a bit more modern SATA, used in most modern systems We need to be aware of them because the way that Linux refers to them.
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IDE When a computer can use IDE, you see two forty-pin connectors on the motherboard. These are the primary and the secondary IDE channnels. They are usually labelled. To each channel, you can attach two disks. One is called the master. The other is called the slave.
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master and slave One method to select master and slave is to set jumpers on the disk. The position of the jumpers is often written on the disk. Otherwise The other method is called “cable select”. There you place the master at the end of the 40 pin IDE cable.
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device names Linux needs to give the devices names in other to talk to them. The device names for IDE are /dev/hda for the primary master /dev/hdb for the primary slave /dev/hdc for the secondary master /dev/hdd for the secondary slave
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SCSI and SATA SCSI and SATA drives are named /dev/sda /dev/sdb etc.
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