EDEE 332 Assignment_Cycle Inv Enact_E-Portfolio_Winter2017_FNL.pdf

EDEE 332 Assignment_Cycle Inv Enact_E-Portfolio_Winter2017_FNL.pdf

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Unformatted text preview: EDEE 332 Assignment: Cycle of Enactment and Investigation/E-­‐Portfolio: Orchestrating a Whole-­‐Class Discussion1 Date of your in-­‐class rehearsal will vary; your instructor will provide details in class. Final Assignment (E-­‐Portfolio) is due to your Instructor Friday, March 17 Orchestrating whole-­‐class discussions in mathematics is central to supporting students to develop procedural and conceptual understandings of mathematics, to develop their ability to communicate about their ideas, and to engage in mathematical argumentation. In this course, we will focus on three types of discussions: a) discussions that problematize students’ thinking; b) discussions where we ask students to compare multiple solutions or strategies to a complex task to advance students thinking; and c) discussions in which students construct mathematical definitions. You will participate in one cycle of enactment and investigation specific to one content area (measurement, geometry, or statistics). This assignment will provide you with structured opportunities to plan, rehearse orchestrating a whole-­‐class discussion in class, analyze your rehearsal, enact a task that leads to a discussion with students, analyze your enactment, and improve upon your teaching. For your final product, you will be asked to create a mathematics component in your E-­‐Portfolio where you present your reflections of your teaching from the enactment. Step 1: Identify a group of 2-­‐3 novice teachers, preferred grade level and a classroom to enact your activity, and state your preferences for the activity you would like to enact. You need to choose a group of 2-­‐3 novice teachers (EDEE 332 students in your section) that will work together on this assignment (the number in the group will depend on the type of activity you will enact). In your group, identify a preferred grade level and a classroom (or location) where you will be able to enact your activity. Your instructor will present you with a choice of activities to enact (which are, in some cases, specific to grade levels). In class on Day 2, you will be asked to state your preferences for activities. Your instructor will notify you of your assigned activity and rehearsal date. If you are in the Advanced Standing Program or in Year 4, we encourage you to do an earlier rehearsal (such as one of the measurement ones). Please note that you may do your enactment in French. If you need access to students, please speak to your instructor. Activity Targeted Grade Levels # of Group Members Measurement – Attributes of Measure Grades K-­‐1 2 Measurement – Bookshelf Activity Grades 2-­‐3 2 Measurement – Broken Ruler Task Grades 3-­‐6 3 Measurement – Create a New Activity Any Grade 2-­‐3 Statistics – Inventing Data Displays Grades 3-­‐6 3 Statistics – Inventing Measures of Central Tendency Grades 3-­‐4 3 Dates for In-­‐Class Rehearsal Classes 7 & 8 (Jan. 26 or 27 & Jan. 30 or 31) Classes 7 & 8 (Jan. 26 or 27 & Jan. 30 or 31) Classes 7 & 8 (Jan. 26 or 27 & Jan. 30 or 31) Classes 7 & 8 (Jan. 26 or 27 & Jan. 30 or 31) Class 10 (Feb. 6 or 7) Class 10 (Feb. 6 or 7) 1 Our use of the “cycle of investigation and enactment” is adapted from the Learning Teaching in, from, and for Practice Project ( ). EDEE 332 Winter 2017 1 Statistics – Create a New Activity Any Grade 2-­‐3 Geometry – Constructing Definitions Grades K-­‐6 3 Geometry – Create a New Activity Any Grade 2-­‐3 Class 10 (Feb. 6 or 7) Class 13 (Feb. 16 or 17) Class 13 (Feb. 16 or 17) Step 2: Once you know your task and rehearsal date, arrange to enact your activity with 7-­‐10 willing elementary students in a certain grade level/cycle. Ensure that you will have access to a set of 7-­‐10 willing participants to be your students (note that you may do the enactment with more students). You must choose elementary students whose grade level/cycle is appropriate to the task you are going to use (please see table on previous page). Arrange for a date/time in which you can enact your activity with them. We would suggest allowing for 45 minutes – 1 hour. The Enactment date must be after you have rehearsed your activity in class, and before the due date of the final assignment (which is March 17). Note that you are not expected to enact your activity with students by the end of the 6.5-­‐weeks of 332 instruction. (Note: If you anticipate having fewer than 7 students, please speak to your instructor.) Step 3: In your group, prepare your protocol. *Date that your group’s protocol is due to your instructor:________________________ (Due 1 week prior to your Rehearsal; if not, 5 points will be deducted from your final assignment.) Empty Protocol to Use Activity Protocol Due ** Note that you may use your own lesson plan template if you choose. Measurement – Pumpkin Math Comparing Solutions Measurement – Bookshelf Activity Problematizing Students’ Thinking Measurement – Broken Ruler Task Comparing Solutions Measurement – Create a New Activity Your own lesson plan template Statistics – Inventing Data Displays Comparing Solutions Statistics – Inventing Measures of Central Tendency Comparing Solutions Statistics – Create a New Activity Your own lesson plan template Geometry – Constructing Definitions Definitions Geometry – Create a New Activity EDEE 332 Winter 2017 Your own lesson plan template Classes 5 & 6 (Jan. 19 or 20 & Jan. 23 or 24) Classes 5 & 6 (Jan. 19 or 20 & Jan. 23 or 24) Classes 5 & 6 (Jan. 19 or 20 & Jan. 23 or 24) Classes 5 & 6 (Jan. 19 or 20 & Jan. 23 or 24) Class 8 (Jan. 30 or 31) Class 8 (Jan. 30 or 31) Class 8 (Jan. 30 or 31) Class 11 (Feb. 9 or 10) Class 11 (Feb. 9 or 10) 2 In class, we will look at samples of students’ solutions to each task ahead of the rehearsal (either in videos or using written student work). The student solutions will help you anticipate how the students in your target class will solve the problem. For each activity, we will spend time in class helping your plan parts of your lesson, which may include: analyzing the solutions, identifying similarities and differences in the solutions, [for the comparing solutions tasks] planning ahead of time how you might want to sequence solutions and why, [for the definition task] planning which objects to include in the sort and how to sequence them, and planning a few key questions you would like to pose in a whole-­‐class discussion to support students to make sense of each other’s reasoning and to advance their thinking. Note that we will not work on all these aspects for each task, but will attend to some depending on the task. You will also be provided with an empty protocol for your activity type (comparing solutions, problematizing, or definitions). It is your group’s responsibility to fill in the empty protocol so that it focuses on a set of instructional goals that are relevant for your students (we will discuss instructional goals in class). Alternatively, you may choose to use your own lesson plan template if you would prefer. If you do so, just keep in mind some of the suggestions of what to focus on from the empty protocol. Your group must submit your protocol to your instructor on myCourses one week prior to your in-­‐class rehearsal. Your instructor will look over your protocol and provide brief feedback before your rehearsal. You are also encouraged to ask your instructor for feedback before you write your protocol. In addition, if you are assigned a Mathematical Definitions Task (Geometry): In the empty protocol, we have provided examples related to triangles. However, we encourage you to choose your focal object depending on the grade level and group of students you will be working with. For example, if you are working with the lower grades, you might choose to do “triangle” but if you are working with the upper grades, you might choose an object like “polygon” or “quadrilateral.” You will also be provided with a starting set of objects that you can use to create the sort that you provide the students. In class, we will talk about which objects we might include and why. Step 4: Participate in a rehearsal of your activity during class time. *Date of your group’s rehearsal (to be determined in class): _______________________ On the date of your rehearsal, each novice teacher will rehearse his/her phase of the activity. Each person will have 7-­‐9 minutes for rehearsing his or her part. If you are not leading the activity, you may be expected to participate as a student and to offer thoughtful feedback to your peers. Your group’s rehearsal will be video-­‐recorded in class. Your instructor will ensure that you get a copy of the video-­‐recording. Please note that we will not be formally evaluating your rehearsal in class. The in-­‐ class rehearsal is exactly that—a place for you to practice important aspects of teaching mathematics for understanding. Also, please note that you are not permitted to team-­‐teach during the rehearsal. It is important that each group member have an opportunity to individually lead the activity. If you will be doing your enactment in French, please let your instructor know so that he/she can try to arrange for your rehearsal to be in French as well. EDEE 332 Winter 2017 3 Step 5: Analyze your individual participation in the rehearsal of the activity (OPTIONAL). If you would like to receive feedback, you may prepare a 1-­‐2-­‐page individual analysis of your rehearsal (typed, double-­‐spaced, Times New Roman or equivalent font, 12 point). Your analysis should focus on what you did in the rehearsal (i.e., do not analyze what other members of your group did). Your analysis of your rehearsal is optional. If you choose to complete a reflection, please speak to your instructor to arrange a deadline for submitting your reflection so that your instructor can provide timely feedback. You will be asked to email your reflection to your instructor. Your instructor will then provide you with electronic feedback before your enactment. The goal of the feedback will be to help you improve your analysis of your teaching and to improve your practice in the upcoming enactment. Alternatively, you can speak to your instructor about scheduling a time to view your rehearsal video with him or her to discuss your reflections and any feedback your instructor might have for your teaching. If you choose to do your rehearsal reflection, include one or both of the following: Reflection of a Moment of your Practice Intended to Target your Instructional Goals This part should focus on how your teaching practices were intended to target your instructional goals during a moment of your lesson. Select one moment from your teaching to focus on. In your presentation of this moment, include the following: • A clip of the audio or video from that moment. A viewer should be able to click on the clip and listen or watch what happened. • A brief description of what happened in this moment. Your description needs to give the viewer a sense of what happened in that moment (e.g., “At this moment, I had just shown the students a rectangle (pictured below) and asked the students the question, “Do you think that this object is a triangle?” In the audio clip, a student explained that “no, I do not think it is a triangle because it’s too thin.” I then responded to this student by saying, “Come up and show us what you mean by too thin.”) • An explanation of how your teaching practice was important for targeting one of your mathematical content instructional goals. Here, focus on at least one of the teaching practices that we worked on in both math courses – eliciting & responding to student thinking, representing students’ thinking, orienting students to each other’s thinking, or maintaining expectations. Be sure in your explanation that it will be clear to the viewer what your goal was in that moment. Keep your explanation brief but clearly connected to students’ mathematical learning. EDEE 332 Winter 2017 4 Reflection of a Moment that you would like to Change This part should focus on a moment of your teaching that you would like to improve for the future. Select one moment from your teaching to focus on. In your presentation of this moment, include the following: • A clip of the audio or video from that moment. A viewer should be able to click on the clip and listen or watch what happened. • A brief description of what happened in this moment. Your description needs to give the viewer a sense of what happened in that moment (as described in the example above). • Give an example of what you would do differently (e.g., the questions you would ask, or the language you would use). Be very specific in your descriptions. For example, if you would like to change the way you elicited students’ thinking, write the exact question you would ask if you were to “replay” the moment. This will allow you to plan ahead for similar situations. Specify which practice of high quality teaching you are targeting with your change. • Explain why you would want to make that particular change (e.g., why you would ask that particular question or represent the student contribution in that particular way). Keep in mind your instructional goals to help you think about how to better support students’ learning. Step 6: In your group, enact and audio or video-­‐record your activity outside of class with 7-­‐10 willing students. *Date of your Enactment: _______________________ (Be sure to provide enough time for your instructor to provide feedback on the Rehearsal Reflection, should you choose to complete it.) Audio or Video-­‐recording the Enactment Your group is responsible for audio or video-­‐recording your enactment (choose what you feel will be most useful for your E-­‐Portfolio). Please arrange in advance to have access to an audio or video-­‐ recording device. Make sure to test your equipment and ensure that your device has enough memory and battery. The Faculty of Education Audiovisual Equipment Loan Service (room 328) has audio recorders, video-­‐cameras and tripods available. Additionally, it is useful to have a back-­‐up recording device (e.g., cell phone). It is very important that you ensure the quality of your audio or video-­‐recording is high (i.e., it should be easy to see/hear). This will provide you better material for your E-­‐Portfolio. You will need to transfer the recording to a digital file so that you can share it among your group members and so that you can select clips to include in your E-­‐Portfolio (to turn into your instructor). You can ask the people in the Education Audiovisual Equipment Loan Service for assistance with this, should you need help. Because you will be working with children, it is important to do the following: • Obtain consent from parents (consent forms are available on myCourses in English and French) • When video-­‐recording, focus the camera only on the teacher. Make sure that the camera is placed high enough so it will not capture the students. • Do not allow the children’s faces to be in the video. We suggest having one group member stand at the video camera. If a student stands up and is visible, cover the lens with your hand or turn the EDEE 332 Winter 2017 5 camera away until the student sits down. That way, you will still have the sound, but will avoid having the child’s image in the video. Photos of Student Work and/or the Board We encourage you to take photos of student work (especially those you highlight during the discussion), materials, and/or the board. This will provide you more material to use when designing your showcase math page for your E-­‐Portfolio. How to Structure your Group’s Enactment Each person in the group should lead the phase for which s/he is responsible (i.e., enact the part that you rehearsed in class). When not leading a phase, the group member should stand to the side and/or help with the video or audio-­‐recording. Please note that you are not permitted to team-­‐teach during the enactment. It is important that each group member has an opportunity to individually lead the activity. However, while the students are working on the activity (e.g., sorting the shapes, etc.), all group members should circulate around the room to note what students are doing and to ask clarifying or pressing questions. We suggest that all of you confer about what you are seeing, as the student work should inform the way you orchestrate a discussion. Please discuss with your instructor ahead of time if you have identified a setting to conduct your activity in which the language of instruction is not English. Please note that we will not be formally evaluating your out-­‐of-­‐class enactment. We will, however, evaluate your analysis of the enactment (as presented in your E-­‐Portfolio). That said, it is in your best interest to prepare for your enactment with your group as much as possible. This will allow you to improve upon your teaching and will provide you with rich material to include in your E-­‐Portfolio. Step 7: Create a Portion of your E-­‐Portfolio in which you Reflect on your Enactment. E-­‐Portfolio links are due Friday, March 17 to your Instructor on myCourses (by midnight). For the final product of your assignment, you will need to create a section of your E-­‐Portfolio where you can showcase your math teaching. For example, you might create a section labeled “Math” or “STEM” or “Math & Science.” In this section, you will create a “showcase math lesson” where you present the lesson from your enactment. In addition, you will create additional components to reflect your math teaching. Although you may collaborate with your group for portions of the assignment, each person must submit their own showcase math lesson in their E-­‐Portfolio. The goal of the math section is to provide the viewer (e.g., a principal, fellow teacher, future employer) a sense of your mathematics teaching and to also provide you an opportunity to reflect on your math teaching. The math section of your E-­‐Portfolio needs to include the following parts (more details are included on the following pages): A page for your Showcase Math Lesson (from the Enactment) A page to highlight your stance as a math teacher A page to highlight another example of your math teaching EDEE 332 Winter 2017 6 You will need to submit a word document containing a link to your E-­‐Portfolio on myCourses. In this document, be sure to indicate what the pages are for your stance as a math teacher and your additional example of your math teaching. An assignment is considered late if any of the components are missing. You should design your math section to be concise and easy to read and follow along. Create the section so that a principal, teacher, or future employer will understand. On the last page, we have provided some suggestions for reducing the amount of text. Your Math Section must consist of the following parts and respond to the questions, as indicated: Showcase Math Lesson Page The showcase math lesson is intended to provide a viewer with an overview of the lesson from your enactment. At the very least, you must include the following (but can include more if you wish): 1) Information about the Lesson: Briefly provide information about the task/lesson that you engaged in for your enactment. This overview is intended to help provide a viewer a sense of what the lesson entailed. Your overview must include the following: • A brief description of the instructional goals for the lesson. Include your content goals (e.g., the mathematical ideas). It is optional to include the practice goals. • A brief description and/or a picture of what the task was. Note that you can just include an image of the problem or the handout without any text. Alternatively, you can include a link to the handout. • A brief description of the structure of the lesson. This can just be one line: Example: “Students were asked about ideas in measurement, were introduced...
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