Class 25 Notes - Chapter EIGHTEEN Human Resource Policies...

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1 Human Resource Policies and Practices Chapter EIGHTEEN
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2 Job Analysis Definition: Job analysis is a systematic procedure for describing jobs. It is a thorough review of a job and its component tasks. Includes: Job description which deals with task requirements Job specification which focuses on the worker requirements. KSAO’s which stands for Knowledge, Skills, Abilities, and Other.
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3 Purposes of Job Analysis Improve/develop employee selection procedures. Improve/develop performance appraisal procedures. Identify training gaps and appropriate methods. Improve training content. Job design and job reengineering. Develop appropriate compensation programs. Manage EEOC issues.
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4 Who should be involved? Incumbents. Managers. Team members. Consultants (or other outsiders)
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5 Methods of Collecting Information: Interview Most frequently used Can be done individually or in groups. Pros: question job experts. Cons: workers may distort information. Success depends on interviewing skills.
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6 Methods of Collecting Information: Observation Pros: Good for manual tasks. Observer can see whole cycle. Cons: Hawthorne Effect. Limited for mental jobs. May miss infrequent tasks. Subject to observer interpretation.
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7 Methods of Collecting Information: Questionnaire Pros: Cheap and efficient. Can be done on employee’s time. Can collect information from a lot of workers. Can quantify results. Cons: Time consuming and costly to develop and validate. Misunderstandings or misinterpretations can not be clarified.
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8 Methods of Collecting Information: Diaries/Logs Involves keeping lists of what is done on a daily basis over a specified period of time. Pros: Good for managerial jobs. Information can be extensive and thorough. Information collected from employees doing the job. Cons: Workers may resist. Infrequent activities may be missed.
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9 Methods of Collecting Information: Beeper Studies Involves wearing a beeper and recording what you are doing when the beeper goes off. Pros: Good for managerial jobs. Information collected from employees doing the job. Cons: Intrusive. Workers may misrepresent. Infrequent activities may be missed.
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10 Job Analysis Approaches Worker Orientation (Behavior) Critical Incidents PAQ Work Orientation (Tasks) Task Analysis Inventories Functional Job Analysis
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Recruitment Definition: Process of generating a pool of applicants. Serves a PR function.
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Class 25 Notes - Chapter EIGHTEEN Human Resource Policies...

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