HIST 447 Paper - Germany Tech

HIST 447 Paper - Germany Tech - Death and Destruction:...

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Death and Destruction: German Technological Advancements During World War II Greg Zimmerman Presented to: Dr. M. Stone Summer 2008
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Introduction Throughout the world, many countries have come to obtain certain reputations. China, for example, had a reputation for many years of “backwards engineering” other nations products and then selling them much cheaper. They have now moved on from this and have gained much more respect in the electronics industry as a nation with respectable knowledge concerning electronic devices. As well, Japan has always been known for producing quality vehicles and other products at a reasonable price to the consumer. Just as these other countries have gained their reputations, Germany has always had a reputation of being a nation with technological prowess. Throughout World War II, Germany made many technological advances, yet lost the war because of both economic and military reasons. Nevertheless, German technology has survived this defeat and emerged as a worldwide technological leader. This paper will illustrate some of the technological breakthroughs made by the Germans during World War II, such as the V-2 Rocket, Me-262, the Panzer and Panther Tanks, U-Boats and more. In addition, this paper will then examine the sociological impacts along with the long lasting effects of the weapons and the defeat of the Germans as to how it has affected the nation up to the present day.
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Leading to World War II After World War I, military strategists realized that with the new technology that had arrived, the military tactics being used were horribly outdated. Charging with rifle and bayonet to the enemy’s trench was no longer possible, as machine guns would destroy thousands of soldiers in minutes. With many weapons favoring a defensive position in World War I, there was a large need to even this out and create offensive weapons that could break the virtual “stalemate” that had occurred so often. In 1939 Germany began World War II with technological and training pre- eminence. Germany had the best of many industries at that time, including among the most important: the steel industry. The Germans’ steel production and metallurgy quality were vastly superior to the British counterparts at the time. German armor plating and guns were half the weight and performed better than Allied equipment at the time. For example, the German 11” guns easily bettered the British 13” guns, and the German 88 millimeter anti-aircraft/anti-tank guns known by the Allied soldiers as the “German 88’s” were unsurpassed in their performance [1]. Not only did they have the best metals to work with, but they had some of the best tools and training to use as well. The German apprenticeship training prepared men to work on some of the best equipment with the best tools, which was a definite advantage once the war was underway [1]. Germany was also producing some of the best engines of the time. Their piston
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This note was uploaded on 10/06/2008 for the course HIST 447 taught by Professor N/a during the Summer '08 term at SDSMT.

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HIST 447 Paper - Germany Tech - Death and Destruction:...

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