utf8''Soci 1121 Aboriginal Issues Notes Revised Part 1 (student).ppt - Sociology 1121 Aboriginal Issues Have you heard of these men Anthany James

Utf8''Soci 1121 Aboriginal Issues Notes Revised Part 1 (student).ppt

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Sociology 1121 Sociology 1121 Aboriginal Issues
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Have you heard of these men? Anthany James Dawson (30) Frank Paul (47) Neil Stonechild (17) Lloyd Dustyhorn (53) Rodney Naistus (25) Lawrence Wegner (30)
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Have you heard of these women? Sarah Jean Devries Michelle Gurney Stephanie Lane Tanya Holvk Dawn Crey
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What does it mean to be Aboriginal in Canada? Terminology: The term “Indian” originated with Christopher Columbus, who in 1492 got hopelessly lost in his search for a sea route to India and stumbled upon North America He mislabeled the indigenous people he met there as “Indians” Native and A boriginal : refers to 55 or more sovereign peoples (including the Inuit, Cree, Mi’kmaq, Blackfoot, Iroquois, and Haida) who had established themselves on the North American continent thousands of years before the arrival of European explorers and settlers
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What does it mean to be Aboriginal in Canada? Terminology: Native and Aboriginal are blanket terms which include the Inuit (4%), status and Indians (or First Nations), non-status Indians and Metis people (32%) The term First Nation applies only to those who are status or registered Indian under the Indian Act There are 615 First Nation groups in Canada They comprise 61% of all Aboriginal peoples (2.6%) of Canadian pop) 75% are status (registered under the Indian Act ), making up 45.5% of the total Aboriginal pop
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What does it mean to be Aboriginal in Canada? Among First Nations, there are numerous categories: Registered Indian (or status) – come under the Indian Act and Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) Essentially, considered “wards of the state” – come under federal jurisdiction Many individuals lost or gave up their status by gaining an university education, in order to vote, or through marriage (women who married non-FN partners lost their status, as did their children) Bill C-31 in 1985 allowed those who had lost their status to reclaim it, and more than 100,000 did so 2011 Census: 1,400,685 Canadians claim Aboriginal ancestry (4.3% of Canadian pop)
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Historical Overview Canada’s Aboriginal peoples are believed to have migrated to NA from Asia an estimated 40,000 years ago European settlers were dependent on FN for their knowledge and skill, particularly during the fur trade FN people found themselves abandoning their traditional economy and material culture as the demand for furs provided greater access to European goods and ideas By the mid-1800s, the relationship between the BR and FN was no longer so equal By this time, Aboriginal populations were decimated, mainly due to European diseases such as typhoid, small pox, and measles, for which they had no immunity In some Nations such as the Haida, 85-90% of the population was wiped out
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Historical Overview In 1857, the government passed the Gradual Civilization Act aimed at assimilation, which included government funding for residential schools In 1876, the Indian Act placed FN peoples under the formal protection and
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