Lab+Moon1.docx - Name Lunar Phase Simulator Student Guide...

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Name: Lunar Phase Simulator – Student Guide Part I: Background Material Answer the following questions after reviewing the background pages for the simulator. Page 1 – Introduction to Moon Phases Is there a dark side of the moon? (Note: this question can be effectively answered either yes or no, so it is important to explain your reasoning.) ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ How long does it take the moon to complete one cycle of phases, in days? 29.5 days If the moon is full today, what phase do you expect it to be at in a week? Third quarter How about one month later? A full moon Many words in astronomy also non-astronomical uses as well. Using your knowledge of how the terms on the left are used in astronomy match them with the non- astronomical uses on the right. Waning C A. convex, rounded -- also hunch-backed, having a hump Gibbous A B. to increase in size, quantity, volume, intensity, etc. NAAP – Lunar Phase Simulator 1 /15
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Waxing B C. decrease in magnitude, importance, brilliancy, intensity, etc. NAAP – Lunar Phase Simulator 2 /15
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The following sketches of the moon's appearance were made over about four weeks. Identify the phases and put them in the correct numerical order. One is labeled for you. Picture Order Phase Picture Order Phase A 3 Warning crecent D 4 First quarter B 1 waning gibbous E 5 Waxing gibbous C 6 Full moon F 2 Third quarter Page 2 – Introduction to Moon Phases From the perspective of an observer above the North Pole, the moon moves clockwise / counter-clockwise (circle) in its orbit around the earth. In the diagram below the sun's light is coming in from the right. The moon's location is marked at several points on its orbit. These are the points the moon was at when the sketches above were drawn. Identify each position with the letter of the corresponding sketch. NAAP – Lunar Phase Simulator 3 /15
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clockwise starting from the top: D, A, F, B, C, E Page 3 – The Time of Day Use the interactive diagram at the bottom of the page to determine the direction of the earth’s rotation when viewed from above the North Pole. (Hint: rotate the observer – the stickfigure – to the noontime position, then sunset position, then midnight position, and finally back to sunrise position. The earth has made one co mplete rotation and the observer has experience one daily (diurnal) cycle of day and night.) When viewed from above the North Pole, does the earth rotate clockwise or counter-clockwise? Counter clockwise Page 4 – Rising and Setting When the moon crosses the western side of the horizon plane it is rising / setting (circle). When it crosses the eastern side of the horizon plane it is rising / setting (circle). NAAP – Lunar Phase Simulator 4 /15
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Page 5 – The Horizon Diagram Describe the location of the moon in the sky of the horizon diagram at bottom.
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