Management of the cancer part 3 bone and skin.pdf - Bone Cancer Bone Cancer Primary basically a rare event at 1 involves Osteosarcoma The bone forming

Management of the cancer part 3 bone and skin.pdf - Bone...

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Bone Cancer Bone Cancer Nursing Assessment Interventions Primary: basically a rare event at 1% involves Osteosarcoma: The bone forming The prognosis depends if it has metastasized to the lungs Most frequent in males age 10-25 because the fast growing bones In older people, with Paget's disease or radiation exposure Common sites: distal femur, proximal tibia, proximal humerus or the knee Chondrosarcoma malignant tumors of the hyaline cartilage which is the second most common Bulky, slow growing, Usually in adults Sites include: pelvis, femur, humerus, spine, scapula, tibia and ribs Fibrosarcoma collagen forming tumors Adults, more females Femur, tibia Secondary Metastatic bone disease from breast, lung, prostate, kidney, ovary and thyroid Sites: skull, spine, pelvis, femur, humerus, and involve more than one bone Patho Etiology: unknown In primary cancer bone cancer increases with long bone growth. Malignant tumors are osteolytic which is bone destroying. It weakens the bone resulting in pathological fractures Manifestations Pain: comes on slowly, lasts more than a week, becomes worse at night. It can be constant or intermittent Mass: a swelling or a lump that is on the bone. It’s firm with slight tenderness. It may interfere with function or cause fractures Impaired function: such as muscular weakness, atrophy, and limited range of motion Hx: Age Osteosarcomas are present in younger people because of the fast rate of growth of the bones Hx. Paget’s disease: They may be symptomatic at first and it may present with a pathological fracture before a diagnosis is made Presenting symptoms Physical May be symptom free Pain or be pain-free swelling Bony Mass: palpate a tender fixed mass limited range of motion, edema Wt. loss which is ominous Pathological fracture may be spinal cord compression with neuro deficits Others: Physical symptoms that may appear are muscle weakness, fatigue, anorexia, nausea, vomiting, polyuria, cardiac dysrhythmias, and seizures Diagnostic tests X-ray, CT, MRI, bone scan, arteriography With metastatic destruction, the bone looks to have a moth eaten appearance Biopsy can be performed, but are limited
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  • Fall '16
  • Karen Price
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