Hinduism

Hinduism - Hinduism Hinduism traces its roots to the Vedas:...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Hinduism Hinduism traces its roots to the  Vedas : sacred writings of the Aryans.  The preliminary stage in the development of Hinduism is the religion of the  Indus Valley Civilization.  Late Aryan religion, dominated by a priestly cast known as Brahmins who  sought an esoteric knowledge, provided the foundation for the basic worldview of  all the religions studied in this chapter. Invaders in India Huns (central Asia) Europeans Moghul Empire : greatest Muslim dynasty in India Akbar : One of the first Moghul rulers o Committed to religious tolerance Sikhism : Sought to combine the best from the two traditions, emerged  and became a significant religion; it continues to play an important role in India.  Mhandas K. Gandhi ( Mahatma or “great-souled one”)
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Became leader of the Indian National Congress Challenged British rule through a campaign of passive, nonviolent  resistance Challenged the iron-grip of the traditional caste system on Indian  society Was a mediator between Muslims and Hindus Skillfully orchestrated the movement of civil disobedience that  ultimately convinced the British to allow India to become independent  in 1947. Karma Our karmic selves act and are acted upon Karma: law explaining the cause-and-effect relationship operative in  human behavior. It is a key link in the basic South Asian world view.  “You reap what you sow”: Karam is no just a part of what we are as  humans; karma fully explains us as physical, emotional, and  intellectual beings. We are inevitably determined in our future actions by the effects of our  past actions.  Problem: Attachment Because we desire, we act, and because we act we develop a sense  of our own separate identity as willful beings. It is this attachment to  the karmic self, rooted in desire, which entraps us Unless it is broken, we are trapped.
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 7

Hinduism - Hinduism Hinduism traces its roots to the Vedas:...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online