Loyalty in Beowulf

Loyalty in Beowulf - Loyalty in Beowulf There are quite a...

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Loyalty in Beowulf There are quite a few hints toward the theme of loyalty in the epic poem Beowulf. In the first few lines of the prologue, we learn about Scyld Scefing, who was a good and great king. We learn of his death and of his son, Beowulf, a man as good as his father. Though it is not mentioned or even hinted at, I figured that Beowulf’s goodness is a type of loyalty to his father (keeping some sort of tradition that the Scefing family is a good family). In one of the next lines, the word “loyal” is actually used to describe Beowulf’s potential future. When Scyld dies, his people show a loyalty to the Lord, culture, and to their king by doing a traditional funeral. In the beginning of part one of the epic, we learn of Hrothgar, the king of the Danes. Hrothgar’s warriors exhibit an attempt of loyalty to their king and to each other by fighting off a monster for years, but to no avail. This monster enters the king’s great hall (Heorot), a place they go to be entertained and eat. This monster, Grendel, kills and eats people and nobody can seem to kill him.
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This document was uploaded on 10/08/2008.

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Loyalty in Beowulf - Loyalty in Beowulf There are quite a...

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