Midterm Answers

Midterm Answers - 410 Midterm Name: Each question is worth...

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This is a non-exclusive arrangement between a writer and a producing entity to develop an original idea, a novel, a play, or a magazine article, into a screenplay. A Development Deal may include other elements like a specific director or producer, which can add great value to the idea that may be developed. This is an agreement that lasts 3 or more years between a movie studio and a producing entity on a first look basis. Basically, this agreement forces the producing entity to pitch all of his ideas, whether original or based on other material, to this movie studio first. If the studio doesn’t want to develop the idea, the producer is free to take it to any other studio or financier. This is an exclusive agreement that lasts 3 or more years between a movie studio and a producing entity. It is exactly like a First Look Deal, except if the movie studio doesn’t want to develop the idea into a movie, then the producing entity is not permitted to take the idea to another studio or financier. These deals differ in that the Development Deal is an agreement that is made after a studio likes the producing entity’s idea and decides to make a screenplay out of it, whereas the First Look and Exclusive Deals are more long term agreements telling where a producing entity must pitch his ideas to. 410 Midterm Name: Each question is worth four points for a total of 40 points, with an additional four points for the Bonus Question. The amount of space available after each question should provide ample room for the correct answers. The professor appreciates those who submit a typewritten copy of the questions with answers. Please provide concise answers. Since it’s a take-home midterm, the Professor will grade accordingly --- picky, picky, picky. 1. What are the five major elements a studio considers in choosing projects to put into production? 2. Explain the following types of deals between a studio and a writer, a producer, or other producing entity and how they differ from the others. Development Deal: First Look Deal: Exclusive Deal: 1. The script/screenplay 2. Producer (and his track record) 3. Director 4. Principle cast 5. Budget
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410 Midterm Page 2 3. Why does Producer David Puttnam say movie studios have a poor “batting average” developing screenplays with a writer? 4. A project at a major studio goes into turnaround with $500,000.00 against it. What does that mean (It’s a two part question)? A. B. Because executives at movie studios are under immense pressure to report the progress of the script being developed every week at production meetings. And since the executive only spends about 40 minutes per week with the writer looking over the most recent draft of the script (in a weekly “script conference”), this is usually not enough time to properly develop the screenplay from draft to draft, which is a complex, tedious, and difficult task. Instead of taking the necessary time, the executive simply decides
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Midterm Answers - 410 Midterm Name: Each question is worth...

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