Lect Notes 09-04-08

Lect Notes 09-04-08 - Lecture Notes Lecture Notes Page 1...

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Lecture Notes 9/4/08 Page 9/4/08 Lecture Notes Beginning of The Polis – men & women aristocrats live different lives than one another (unlike male and female peasants) When aristocrats are born, they grow up together in the Women’s Quarters. At age 7, boys leave to live w/ their father. For conduct, a male slave, known as a paidagogos , which is basically a behavioral chaperon , watches the boy to & from school, and makes sure the boy does his homework, chores, etc. Primary Education (age 7yrs – 11y/o) – teaches reading, writing, and arithmetic. Boys went to gymnasium for sports, exercise, & military training Girls, of those who received an education, learned at home Boys learned the alphabet forwards & backwards, then learned syllables, then words (deities & philosophers like Zeus, Apollo, Agamemnon), then they’d learn sentences (maxims) o Greek was all in capital letters, w/ no spaces or punctuation (like a continuous URL). o Arithmetic began with fractions, not whole numbers. Herodas’s works, like Menander’s, survived only on papyrus. Each of Herodas’s 7 Mimes are skits Class notes on Herodas’s Mime 3: The Elementary School Teacher Setting : Primary school Characters : Lampriskos – the teacher Metrotime – the very poor mother Kottalos – Metrotime’s misbehaved son Skit : Metrotime’s purpose is to have her son, Kottalos, beaten very hard b/c she’s frustrated with his behavior. o Metrotime portrays herself sympathetically to Lampriskos by saying: Kottalos destroyed her livelihood She pays his school fee, knowing full well that he’s not learning She feels alone b/c her husband is deaf and blind.
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