IPS6e.ISM.Ch01

IPS6e.ISM.Ch01 - Chapter 1 Solutions 1.1 Exam1 = 95 Exam2 =...

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Chapter 1 Solutions 1.1. Exam1 = 95, Exam2 = 98, Final = 96. 1.2. For this student, TotalPoints = 2 · 88 + 2 · 85 + 3 · 77 + 2 · 90 + 80 = 837, so the grade is B. 1.3. The cases are apartments. There are fve variables: rent (quantitative), cable (categorical), pets (categorical), bedrooms (quantitative), distance to campus (quantitative). 1.4. 31 . 3% = 8 . 7% + 22 . 6% o± young adults have either a bachelor’s degree or an associate degree. 1.5. Shown are two possible stemplots; the frst uses split stems (described on page 11 o± the text). The scores are slightly le±t-skewed; most range ±rom 70 to the low 90s. 5 58 6 0 6 58 7 0023 7 5558 8 00003 8 5557 9 0002233 9 8 5 58 6 058 7 00235558 8 000035557 9 00022338 1.6. Student pre±erences will vary. The stemplot has the advantage o± showing each individual score. Note that this histogram has the same shape as the second histogram in the previous exercise. 50 60 70 80 90 100 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Frequency First exam scores 1.7. The larger classes hide a lot o± detail. 40 60 80 100 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 First exam scores 54
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Solutions 55 1.8. This histogram shows more details about the distribution (perhaps more detail than is useful). Note that this histogram has the same shape as the Frst histogram in the solution to Exercise 1.6. 55 60 65 70 75 80 85 90 95 100 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Frequency First exam scores 1.9. Using either a stemplot or histogram, we see that the distribution is left-skewed, centered near 80, and spread from 55 to 98. (Of course, a histogram would not show the exact values of the maximum and minimum.) 1.10. Recall that categorical variables place individuals into groups or categories, while quantitative variables “take numerical values for which arithmetic operations ... make sense.” Variables (a), (d), and (e)—age, amount spent on food, and height—are quantitative. The answers to the other three questions—about dancing, musical instruments, and broccoli—are categorical variables. 1.13. Possible responses would include heart rate before and after exercise (typically measured with a watch and Fngertip), number of sit-ups (no instrument required), time to run 100 m (measured with a stopwatch). 1.14. Student answers will vary. Recent rankings in U.S. News and World Report used “16 measures of academic excellence,” including academic reputation (measured by surveying college and university administrators), retention rate, graduation rate, class sizes, faculty salaries, student-faculty ratio, percentage of faculty with highest degree in their Felds, quality of entering students (ACT/SAT scores, high school class rank, enrollment-to-admission ratio), Fnancial resources, and the percentage of alumni who give to the school. 1.15. ±orexample, blue is by far the most popular choice; 70% of respondents chose 3 of the 10 options (blue, green, and purple). blue green purple red black orange yellow brown gray white 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 Percent Favorite color
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56 Chapter 1 Looking at Data—Distributions 1.16. Forexample, opinions about least-favorite color are somewhat more varied than favorite colors. Interestingly, purple is liked and disliked by about the same fractions of people.
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IPS6e.ISM.Ch01 - Chapter 1 Solutions 1.1 Exam1 = 95 Exam2 =...

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