Ch 5 - KeyIssuesandQuestions:PossibleAnswers 1. How has the...

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Key Issues and Questions: Possible Answers 1. How has the global human population changed from early times to 1800? From 1800 until the present? What is projected over the next 50 years? “From the dawn of human history until the beginning of the 1800s, population increased slowly and variably, with periodic setbacks. It was roughly 1830 before world population reached the 1 billion mark. By 1930, however, just 100 years later, the population had doubled to 2 billion. Barely 30 years later, in 1960, it reached 3 billion, and in only 15 more years, by 1975, it had climbed to 4 billion. Thus, the population doubled in just 45 years, from 1930 to 1975. Then 12 years later, in 1987, it crossed the 5 billion mark! In 1999, world population passed 6 billion, and it is currently growing at the rate of nearly 77 million people per year.” “On the basis of current trends (which assumes a continued decline in fertility rates), the U.N. Population Division (UNPD) medium projection predicts that world population will pass the 7 billion mark in 2012, the 8 billion mark in 2024, and the 9 billion mark in 2047, and will reach 9.1 billion in 2050. At that point, world population will still be increasing by 34 million per year.” 2. How is the world divided in terms of relative per capita incomes? Fertility rates? Population growth rates? High income, highly developed, industrialized countries : Countries included in this group are the United States, Canada, Japan, Western Europe and Scandinavia, Singapore, Taiwan, Israel, and New Zealand. Only 15% of the world’s population lives in these countries, but these countries control 80% of the world’s wealth. Gross national income per capita (2003) is $9,386 and above, with an average of $28,550. Fertility rate is 1.6 and the growth rates are flat to negative. Middle income, moderately developed countries : Countries in this group include Latin America, northern and western Africa, eastern Asia, eastern Europe, and the countries of the former U.S.S.R. Gross national income per capita (2003) ranges from $766 to $9,385, with an average of $1,920. Low income countries : Countries included in this group are eastern, western, and central Africa, India, other countries in central Asia, and a few former Soviet republics. Gross national income per capita (2003) is less than $766, with an average of $450. Eighty-five percent of the world’s population lives in the middle and low-income countries, but these countries control only 20% of the wealth. Middle to low income country fertility rates are 3.5 (excluding China), with slow to rapid growth rate.
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Ch 5 - KeyIssuesandQuestions:PossibleAnswers 1. How has the...

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