MasteringPhysics-15

MasteringPhysics-15 - MasteringPhysics: Assignment Print...

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MasteringPhysics: Assignment Print View http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrint?assignm. .. 1 of 16 11/18/07 7:32 PM [ Print View ] physics 2211 MP15: Chapter 15 Due at 5:30pm on Sunday, November 25, 2007 View Grading Details Floating Cream In the 1950s, fresh unhomogenized milk in glass bottles was delivered to suburbanites' back doorsteps well before dawn. When delivered, the milk was thoroughly mixed, so that it appeared homogenized, but anyone rising much after sunrise would find that the milk had separated, the cream having risen to the top. Cream and milk are immiscible (like oil and water), and the total volume of liquid does not change when they separate. The top part of the bottle was intentionally given a much smaller diameter than the bottom, so that the cream, typically 3 percent of the total volume, occupied much more than 3% of the total vertical height of the milk-bottle. For this problem, assume that the total height of the milk bottle is and the depth of the cream layer is . Part A Assume that before separation, the weight of the milk bottle's contents (mixed milk and cream) is . How does the combined weight of the milk and cream after separation, , compare to ? ANSWER: Part B Assume that before separation, the pressure at the bottom of the milk bottle is . How does the pressure at the bottom of the milk bottle after separation, , compare to ? For simplicity, you may assume that the weight and density of the cream is negligible compared to that of the milk. [ Print ]
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MasteringPhysics: Assignment Print View http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrint?assignm. .. 2 of 16 11/18/07 7:32 PM Part B.1 Pressure when the bottle contents are mixed For simplicity, assume that the density of the cream is zero, and the density of the rest of the milk is (in general, cream is less dense than the rest of the milk). If the cream represents 3 percent of the total volume of the milk bottle, what is the gauge pressure at the bottom of the milk bottle when the milk and cream are homogeneously mixed? Hint B.1.a Formula for gauge pressure (at depth h) Gauge pressure in a fluid of uniform density is . This pressure is independent of the shape of the cross-section of the container. Part B.1.b Density of the milk and cream mixture. If the density of the cream (3% by volume) is zero, and the density of the rest of the milk is , what is the density of the milk and cream mixture, ? ANSWER: = Express your answer in terms of , , and any physical constants needed. ANSWER: = Part B.2 What is the pressure after the bottle contents have separated Now compute , the gauge pressure on the bottom of the milk bottle after the milk and cream have separated. Assume that the depth of the layer of cream is 20% of the total height of the milk bottle (
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MasteringPhysics-15 - MasteringPhysics: Assignment Print...

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