Prompts Midterm - Part II Long Passage Identifications Passages from the following selection will be included on the midterm In your response you

Prompts Midterm - Part II Long Passage Identifications...

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Part II. Long Passage Identifications Passages from the following selection will be included on the midterm. In your response, you must identify the historical, social, or cultural context in which each passage occurs (e.g. speaker, subject, occasion, purpose, general time period). Evidence of independent insight on the readings is strongly recommended. Text references will not be provided on the actual midterm. 1. “I think I may fairly make two postulata. First, That food is necessary to the existence of man. Secondly, That the passion between the sexes is necessary and will remain nearly in its present state.” (Malthus, An Essay on the Principle of Population ) The passager above can be found in “An Essay on the Principle of Population”, by Malthus. Malthus proposes the two postulates to demonstrate that the population increases in a geometric manner, while food increases in an arithmetic manner, therefore creating a conflict of overpopulation. In his argument he mentions natural occurrences such as violence and famine all help regulate the population and that providing charity for the poor only increases the population. His argument would not be regarded as a valid representation of it’s times because the Industrial Revolution and the agricultural innovation would change the way that the world functioned. 2. “Whatsoever therefore is consequent to a time of Warre, where every man is Enemy to every man; the same is consequent to the time, wherein men live without other security, than what their own strength, and their own invention shall furnish them withall. In such condition, there is no place for Industry; because the fruit thereof is uncertain; and consequently no Culture of the Earth; no Navigation, nor use of the commodities that may be imported by Sea; no commodious Building; no Instruments of moving, and removing such things as require much force; no Knowledge of the face of the Earth; no account

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