250208_lab02 - Canada College Engineering Department ENGR...

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Canada College Engineering Department ENGR 261 Lab Report 25/FEB/2008 Experiment #2 Nodal and Mesh Analyses Superposition, Thevenin, and Norton Equivalent Circuits By Tam, Wilson Chi-Hang (G00621273)
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Experiment #3 : Nodal and Mesh Analyses: Superposition, Thevenin, and Norton Equivalent Circuits Objective : This experiment exposes the students to simple DC circuits, with emphasis on the experimental verification of Thevenin’s theorem, the principle of superposition, and nodal and mesh analyses. It also provides essential practice on using the MultiSIM program to analyze DC circuits, and circuit analysis by applying the mesh current and node voltage methods. By doing so, we will be able to analyze the circuits and see their actual discrepancies from an ideal situation to a virtual situation as constructed by MultiSIM. With that, we will also be able to determine where the discrepancies come from and how to resolve them (such as the neglecting the tolerance in the resistors, the breadboard, the oscilloscope, the wires, and other given factors). By exposing to the principle of superposition, students will be able to analyze circuits by a suppressing source at a time and analyze circuits by the usual analyzing techniques. This will reinforce the student’s knowledge on both nodal and mesh analysis. By exposing to Thevenin’s theorem, students will be able to simplify a complex circuit into a simple Thevenin Equivalent circuit which consists of one basic value of the Thevenin Equivalent Resistance value of R TH and one basic value of the Thevenin Equivalent Voltage value of V OC (Voltage across the Open Circuit) or also known as V TH (Thevenin Equivalent Voltage) With that solved, we will be able to analyze circuits with ease, and regardless of what the load resistor R L that is given to the problem, the student will be able to solve it with ease. We will also be using a series of electronics lab instruments such as an Oscilloscope to read the voltage across the circuit, a digital multimeter (DMM) to measure the current through short-circuit, and a decade box to generate the resistance that we needed without placing a bunch of resistors in series and parallel to attain the resistance we needed for the load resistor. Theory :
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We are to compute the voltages and currents in a circuit by nodal and mesh analysis by hand. Then we are to measure the actual voltages and currents in a circuit by apparatus such as a digital multimeter (DMM), an oscilloscope, and software like MultiSIM, PSpice, and MatLab. We are to expect to run in to discrepancies as the hand computations are purely based on an ideal situation, where the resistors have no tolerance, the wires have no resistance, and the DC voltage source to be exactly what the desired value to be. At the end the computed and measured value should be close to each other in an acceptable range. We can also approximate the values with MultiSIM by implementing the actual tolerance of the resistor into account, so
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This note was uploaded on 10/12/2008 for the course ENGR 215 taught by Professor Enriquez during the Spring '08 term at San Mateo Colleges.

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250208_lab02 - Canada College Engineering Department ENGR...

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