Week 3 Paper [Scrum].docx - SWEN 603 Spring 2017 Week 3...

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SWEN 603 Spring 2017 Week 3 Short Paper – Scrum One of the more familiar types of agile software development is the Scrum methodology. Scrum is an iterative and incremental development (IID) method that uses project management techniques rather than strict procedural guidelines, allowing for easy use with other development methodologies (Larman, 2004). In order to gain of sense of the various uses of Scrum, along with its benefits and drawbacks, it is important to first understand all of the unique characteristics that are involved with this method. Scrum is broken down into four stages: planning, staging, development, and release. The stage that makes Scrum most recognizable is the development stage where the sprints occur. A sprint is an iteration that lasts anywhere from two to four weeks and produces an increment of the desired final software product (Alashqur, 2016). Figure 1. Scrum sprint (Permana, 2015, p. 199) A product backlog is used to initiate the sprint, detailing what is required of the software. Throughout the sprint, the Scrum team holds a brief, daily Scrum meeting to discuss the expectations of the following day. Figure 2. Sequence of sprints (Alashqur, 2016, p. 95)
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Sprints are done both sequentially and in parallel until a final, acceptable, product is created and ready for delivery. Another important feature of Scrum is the distinction of roles: Product Owner, Scrum Master, and Scrum Team. The Product Owner determines the requirements for the software, the Scrum Master runs the Scrum process and ensures it is being followed appropriately, and the Scrum Team is composed of those actually working on the project and completing the Product Backlog (Permana, 2015).
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