The Great War and the Peace Politics and empirer 1919-1935.pdf - Thomas Roskell Dr Stephen July 22nd 2016 Intro British History Since 1660 The Great War

The Great War and the Peace Politics and empirer 1919-1935.pdf

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Thomas Roskell Dr. Stephen July 22nd, 2016 Intro British History Since 1660 The Great War and the Peace, Politics and Empire, 1919-19351. What were the leading impacts of World War I on British ideas of masculinity and femininity? British ideas of masculinity meant that men were meant to go to war and fight or even die in combat; whilst ideas of femininity meant that women were supposed to support the war effort by taking roles as nurses, farmworkers or in factories. They were also expected to keep the home intact. In 1915, unions agreed to loosen their restrictions on employment, enabling women and less skilled men to be hired. For thousands of middle-class women escaping the domestic-life and working to help the war front was rewarding and exhilarating. Welfare benefits to compensate families for the loss of income, due to the deaths of men in the war also improved the lives of women immensely. The gains that women had made in employment and wages during the war, added to the impression that the war was a boon to women that enhanced their social and political standing, at the expense of men. The new voters, composed of newly emancipated women, and the views of the soldiers coming back from war, alarmed much of society. The men were angry at the women, as they felt that women had stolen their jobs and used the war as a way to enhance their standing, while the men died on the battlefield.
2. What were the impacts of World War One on the British Empire in India and the Middle East? Widespread rioting across the subcontinent of India stemmed from the treatment of Indian people and Indian troops during the war and the influenza epidemic, that had spread throughout the world (killing at least 30 million and up to 100 million). Following the war, conditions for much of the Indian population were difficult. Wages, that had prospered in war time, dropped considerably, putting much of the population into debt. In 1917, Edwin Montagu, secretary of state for India, pushed forth to the House of Commons, an act that would expand self-government in India by increasing the number of Indians in every part of the administration. Many provincial governors opposed the act as it took away their power. These governors argued that Montagu’s Act would exacerbate the protests and rioting that had broken out throughout the country. Then in 1919, the British government passed the Rowland’s Act, which allowed for the suspension of a person's rights and imprisonment without trial. The goodwill created by the Montagu Act was replaced with anger and mistrust towards Britons. Indians of all political parties and ideologies put aside their differences and followed the leadership of Mohandas Gandhi. Under Gandhi’s civil disobedience leadership, demonstrations took place in multiple cities and riots took place in Ahmedabad, Delhi, and a number of Punjab provinces. Unaccustomed to seeing people of different religions, castes and political parties put aside their differences to work together, the British officials suspected that a revolutionary conspiracy to overthrow British rule and create an independant Indian state was being hatched. This conspiracy did not actually exist. On April 10th 1919, the arrest of Gandhi caused the city of Amritsar to riot. The riots lead to the deaths to five europeans, and the near killing of a european school
teacher. Order wasn’t restored until authorities sent in armored cars and planes. The next two

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