notesweek7

notesweek7 - NOTES WEEK 7 Migration Population Change and...

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NOTES WEEK 7: Migration, Population Change, and Race I. Slavery & African Immigration A. pre-independence 1. from early 1500s to 1820s a. ca 8 million slaves imported into Latin America B. post-independence 1. 1820s-1880s a. ca 2 million slaves imported into Latin America b. most went to Brazil, Cuba, Puerto Rico 2. suppression of slave trade and abolition in metropole) a. Denmark – 1803 b. Great Britain – 1807 c. United States – 1807 / 1863 d. Netherlands - 1814 e. France - 1831 f. Spain – 1845 g. Portugal – 1850 3. abolition of slavery in colonies a. France – 1794-1802 (Saint Domingue) during Fr. Rev. b. Great Britain – 1833-38 c. Sweden - 1847 d. Denmark – 1848 e. France – 1848 f. Netherlands – 1863 g. United States – 1863-65 h. Spain 1) Puerto Rico – 1873-76 2) Cuba – 1880-1886 i. Portugal (Brazil was technically no longer a colony) 1) Brazil - 1888 II. European Immigration A. Italians 1. major period of immigration – 1880s-1920s a. Argentina – ca 2 m 1) Buenos Aires 1
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2) wheat harvest a ) golondrinas ” – seasonal migrants b. Brazil – 1.5 m 1) São Paulo & southern states 2) labor on coffee plantations B. Spaniards 1. colonial waves a. to all the colonies b. from sw Spain – Extremadura, Andalusia mainly 2. 19 th th century a. from northern Spain – Galicia, Asturias, Santander b. Argentina – ca ¼ m c. Cuba & Puerto Rico 1) immigration to offset “non-white” population 2) ca ¼ m Spaniards into Cuba C. Portuguese 1. post-independence – 1820s-1920s a. ca 1 m into Brazil b. lesser numbers to Argentina, Uruguay, Chile D. Germans 1. 1840s-1900 a. Chile – ca 20,000 1) southern frontier a) Lake Region – near Valdivia & Puerto Montt b) Chiloe Island b. southern Brazil – ca 150,000 1) Santa Catarina, Rio Grande du Sul 2) agricultural colonists c. highland Guatemala – ca 5,000 1) coffee planters E. Other Europeans 1. Welsh – a few thousand a. Chubut River valley of Argentina b. sheep herding, fruit orchards 2. Jews – ca 300,000- ½ million? a. colonial period 1) Sephardic conversos or “cryto-Jews” (converted to Catholicism post-1492) 2) in all major Ibero-urban areas 2
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3) Dutch colonies a) technicians & owners in sugar industry 4) Suriname (Dutch Guiana) a) Joden Savanna b. post-1820s 1) both Sephardic & Ashkenazim 2) Buenos Aires – main destination 3) other cities a) Mexico City, Mexico b ) S a n t i a g o , C h i l e c) Caracas, Venezuela 4) rural colonies a) Sosua, Dominican Republic 1) small refugee group taken in by Trujillo 3. English – ca 200,000 a. Argentina – ca 100,000 1) owners, managers of estancias 2) businessmen in Buenos Aires 4. Poles – ca 200,000 a. Brazil 1) southern Brazil b. Argentina & Uruguay 1) cities 2) agricultural colonies 5. Levantines – ½ m ? a. source areas
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This document was uploaded on 10/12/2008.

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notesweek7 - NOTES WEEK 7 Migration Population Change and...

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