Lesson 2 Assignment.docx - On the morning of January 28th...

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On the morning of January 28 th , 1986, seven brave astronauts suited up, unknowingly, for the last time. Michael Smith, Dick Scobee, Judith Resnik, Ronald McNair, Ellison Onizuka, Gregory Jarvis, and Sharon McAuliffe’s lives were taken when the space shuttle “Challenger” exploded during one of the early phases of taking off. Televised in anticipation of another flawless triumph by the United State’s space program, the devastating incident was witnessed nationally by adults and children alike. This event shook America to its core and, as country that had never seen anything but success from its space program, called for immediate action. President Ronald Reagan responded to the newly found exigence by exchanging his scheduled State of the Union Speech for a televised address to the public (Weinraub, Web). Reagan’s address set out to commemorate those lost in the tragic event as well as remain steadfast in the continuation of the space program’s efforts. The Challenger Address executes Reagan’s goal through the utilization of appeal to pathos, proper diction, and the televised speech delivery. President Reagan made several important choices regarding his address, which made it extremely well received by the public. Firstly, Reagan properly took into account the audience that he was addressing. The American public, composed of men, women, and children, came from extremely different backgrounds, education levels, and age groups, meaning in order for his message to be affective it needed to appeal to everyone. Reagan does this in the address by utilizing one unifying concept: an appeal to pathos.

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