Lesson 5 Assignment.docx - Part 1 As President of the...

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Part 1 As President of the United States, one of the first introductions they have to public as their leader is the Inaugural Address. Given during the inauguration ceremony, each President utilizes this speech to inform the audience of their intentions during their term as president. Due to the ever-changing nature of this event’s constraints and resources, each President’s speech has called upon different purposes and reasoning to resonate their messages with the audience. This essay will analyze three historic inaugural addresses, given by Presidents Franklin D. Roosevelt, John F. Kennedy, and Barack H. Obama, for their usage of reasoning and supporting material to justify their perspective claims. Franklin D. Roosevelt gave his first Inaugural Address in 1933 from Washington D.C. during the peak of the effects of the Great Depression. The occasion was a ceremony for the inauguration of Roosevelt as the 32 nd President of the United States. This being said, Roosevelt was required to be formal and clearly communicate his intentions as president during his incoming term. As an experienced public speaker, the setting gave Roosevelt a familiar area to speak in. The audience included American men, women, and children eager to officially meet and hear from their new President. They were voluntary listeners expecting their new leader to introduce a plan for battling the effects of the depression. The speaker, Roosevelt, was an experienced politician who was well known for his work to tackle the Depression and support reform in the country. He previously served as Governor of New York, Assistant Secretary of the Navy, and a member of the New York State Senate providing those Americans unsure of him as a President some relief knowing he was experienced in policy and leadership. The speech
was powerful and assuring to the audience, offering a promise to the citizens of the United States that he would do everything in his power to tend to the effects of the Great Depression and prevent more hardship for his people. Following his promise, Roosevelt makes the claim of fact in his address that he sees the way the Depression has affected specifically the citizens of America. He states, “More important, a host of unemployed citizens face the great problem of existence and an equally great number toil with little return.” Roosevelt does this to shape the body of his speech where he addresses the claim through brief examples and signs. Beginning with examples, Roosevelt uses brief examples such as saying, “faced by failure of credit, they have proposed only lending of more money” to support his claim that he sees the affects of the depression on his citizens by specifically noting one of its effects. This

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