s21ch3hwsoln - Histogram of Speed 0.020 Density 0.000 0...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Histogram of Speed Speed Density 0 20 40 60 80 100 0.000 0.005 0.010 0.015 0.020 Figure 1: Density-scale histogram of speed for Question 1. Statistics 21: Homework 1 1. The table below depicts data collected in a (hypothetical) survey studying the distribution of traffic speed on the Bay Bridge. Each group includes the left end-point but not the right. (So, for instance, the first group includes cars driving 0 mph (not moving) but does not include cars driving exactly 10 mph.) Use this information to answer the following questions: Speed (mph) Percentage of Total Cars 0-10 20 10-20 10 20-40 40 40-80 20 80-95 10 (a) Draw a histogram of speed on the density scale. See Figure 1. (b) Approximately how many cars are going less than 25 miles per hour? For all histogram problems, we will define the function P ( a X < b ) to be the percentage of data in [ a,b ), which is given by the area of the histogram in this interval. We can divide the cars going less than 25 miles per hour into three groups: those going between 0 and 10, those between 10 and 20, and those between 20 and 25. From the table, we know that 20% of the cars are going between 0 and 10, and 10% are going between 10 and 20. To determine the number going between 20 and 25 miles per hour, we need to rely upon the uniformity assumption within the 20-40 class interval of speed. That is, we think every car within this class is equally likely to be going any speed between 20
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
and 40 miles per hour, and so the cars are spread evenly throughout the class. (This is what ensures that the histogram is drawn as a rectangle.) Under this assumption, the number of cars going 20-25 miles per hour is approximately equal to the number going 25-30, 30-35, or 35-40 miles per hour. That is, we can divide the 20-40 class into 4 equal blocks, each of which has a width of 5 miles per hour and a height of Area Total length = 40 20 = 2%. We now have enough information to approximate the number of cars going less than 25 miles per hour: Percent less than 25 mph = Percent in [0 , 10) + Percent in [10 , 20) + Percent in [20 , 25) = P (0 X < 10) + P (10 X < 20) + P (20 X < 25) = 20% + 10% + [ width of [20 , 25)] * [ Density in [20 , 25)] = 20% + 10% + 5 * 40 20 = 40%. (c) Approximately how many cars are going between 18 and 72 miles per hour? P (18 X < 72) = P (18 X < 20) + P (20 X < 40) + P (40 X < 72) = [ width of [18 , 20)] * [ Density in [18 , 20)] + P (20 X < 40) + [ width of [40 , 72)] * [ Density in [40 , 72)] = (20 - 18) * 10% 10 - 0 + 40% + (72 - 40) * 20% 80 - 40 = 58%. (d) Approximate the 32nd percentile of speed. We know that P (0 X < 20) = P (0 X < 10) + P (10 X < 20) = 20% + 10% = 30%, so 20 miles per hour is the 30th percentile of speed. Likewise, we also know that P (0 X < 40) = P (0 X < 20) + P (20 X < 40) = 30% + 40% = 70%, so 40 miles per hour is the 70th percentile of speed. Therefore, the 32nd percentile must be between 20
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 10/12/2008 for the course STAT 21 taught by Professor Anderes during the Spring '08 term at University of California, Berkeley.

Page1 / 7

s21ch3hwsoln - Histogram of Speed 0.020 Density 0.000 0...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online