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review1f08v1 - McCord Exam 1 Review Sheet version 1 Fall...

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Which Chapter/Sections are covered? Chapters 1-4 were covered in homeworks 1, 2, and 3. I will put no more than 3 questions from those homeworks. The majority of the exam (~85% or more) will be on Chapter 12. All the material on the exam has been covered in one way or another on homeworks 4 and 5. Concentrate on the subject matter emphasized in class and on these homeworks. Come in mentally prepared to answer at least 25 questions, maybe a few more. Yes, there will be calculations, but most of the exam will be theory and concepts. You need to understand the theory and concepts to the level at which we studied it. I don’t expect you to solve the Schrödinger equation, but I do think you should understand what it meant towards modern atomic theory. And, just because you got a homework question right does not necessarily mean you really understand the material. Try explaining the concepts to someone else to see if you really understand. Energy traveling at the speed of light Know what electromagnetic radiation is and how we depict it on the page and conceptually. Know the basics of the entire electromagnetic spectrum (see Figure 12.3, p. 512). Know the approximate wavelengths for each type of radiation given (LOOK at that figure). Know also, that visible light is in the 400-700 nm range (that’s blue end to red end). Other than the two ends, I do not expect you to know the wavelengths of all the colors of the rainbow – however, you SHOULD know the ordering of the colors (think Roy G. Biv). Know the two basic equations that describe electromagnetic radiation: Know how to use this equations to calculate various wavelengths, frequencies, and energies of photons. Know the two views of electromagnetic radiation: as a wave and as a particle (photons) Do all moving particles have wavelength? Yes. Louis de Broglie said if light can be treated as a particle (photon) then why not the other way around? Any moving particle with mass and velocity should have a corresponding wavelength. where p is momentum ( p = mv ) The most important moving object for us is the electron. Now we can treat the electron as a wave. When confined to the region around the nucleus, the electron behaves as a standing wave. What is the essence (observations) of the photoelectric effect? (p. 515) How did Einstein explain this effect? How does this relate to the work function ( ± ) of a metal: Be able to calculate any part of this equation ( m , v , ± , or ² ) if given any 3 of the 4 variables in it The Emission Spectrum of Hydrogen Check out those lines. Lines I tell you. Not broad bands
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