ISB201L-GypsyMothPresentation

ISB201L-GypsyMothPresentation - The Gypsy Moth Lymantria...

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The Gypsy Moth Lymantria dispar
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Historical Data Gypsy Moths are originally from Europe, Asia and North Africa. In 1869, gypsy moths are introduced to United States in Medford, Massachusetts by Leopold Trouvelot. It was brought here with the purpose of finding a species of silk producing moth. This was down with the intention of mixing the silkworm moth but not carry the disease in which the silkworm moth had. Between 1868 and 1869 the scientists who was conducting this experiment endured a problem. These Gypsy Moths ten years later caused defoliated trees and Gypsy moth populations. There is no exact source how gypsy moths came to Michigan, but they could have come from egg masses brought by campers returning from the northeast United States. Since gypsy moths can lay eggs anywhere, egg masses on travel trailers and campers have helped speed up the process, creating pockets of infestations.
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Gypsy Moth Spread in North America 1900 1934 1965 1994 The gypsy moth is currently spreading at a rate of about 21 km / year along the  borders to the west and south. Since females are not capable of flight, this  spread must be attributed to natural movement of wind-borne larvae and  accidental movement of life stages by humans. (USDA 2003)
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This note was uploaded on 03/18/2008 for the course ISB 201 taught by Professor Besaw during the Spring '08 term at Michigan State University.

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ISB201L-GypsyMothPresentation - The Gypsy Moth Lymantria...

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