Pharmacokinetics1

Pharmacokinetics1 - Pharmacokinetics: the movement of the...

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Pharmacokinetics: the movement of the medication through the body
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Determinants of drug action when you take a medication does it take effect immediately? Somehow the medication has to enter your body and then get to the places in your body where they have an effect called target sites. For treating psychopathology where in the body are we aiming to get to? What organ system is utilized to transport drug to target sites?
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Temporal characteristics: onset: how long does it take to “feel” psychoactive effect? duration: how long will this effect last? Which is influenced by the mechanism of the body ridding itself of the drug. Why is this important? Ex: taking a medication before bedtime as a sleeping aid (hypnotic) benzodiazepine. There are certain things to consider as the prescriber and for the consumer of the med. how fast will it work? will it last all night? will it affect person’s psychology/behavior in morning?
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Halcion (triazolam): reaches therapeutic concentration sooner reaches peak sooner effective time range of around 4 hrs Ativan (lorazepam) reaches therapeutic concentration around 5 hrs last for over 12 hrs persists in bloodstream for 24 hrs
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Route of administration Orally (PO) taken by mouth (pill, liquid, sprinkles) Intravenously (IV) injected in liquid form directly into the blood Intramuscularly (IM) injected in liquid form into the muscle (depot) Subcutaneous injected as a liquid under the skin Absorbed through mucus membranes (through oral or nasal administration) Absorption through the skin (transdermal patch) Inhalation microparticles that are vaporized and enter the lungs Rectally (usually in suppository form can also be injected as a gel (Dyastat).
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Vocabulary Routes of administration: PO (by mouth), IV (intravenous), IM (intramuscular). Dosing: BID (2x/day), TID (3x/day), QID (4x/day), PRN (as needed), MDD (Maximum daily dose), q (indicates at or every).
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Absorption-Rate : time between admin and max plasma concentration the absorption rate is one factor that will determine time of onset for IV, absorption-rate is instantaneous for every other route of admin, we can test absorption-rate by administering drug and then testing blood plasma periodically afterwards what factors will determine absorption rate? area of absorbing surface rate of blood flow through absorbing surface # of cell layers between site of admin and circulatory system
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Route of administration: Oral (PO) drug swallowed in mouth, usually in pill form but can also be given as a liquid or sprinkles drug is absorbed through stomach wall and lining of small intestine mostly small intestine, since it possesses so much more surface area oral administration – once in GI tract (stomach and small intestine), drug crosses organ walls across the intestinal mucosa through a process called passive diffusion, enter
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Pharmacokinetics1 - Pharmacokinetics: the movement of the...

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