Slime Mold Report.docx - Christy Freeman BIO 152 LAB 801 Physarum polycephalum Probiotics Christy Freeman BIO 152 LAB 801 August 2nd 2017 1 Slime Mold

Slime Mold Report.docx - Christy Freeman BIO 152 LAB 801...

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Christy Freeman BIO 152 LAB 801 Slime Mold Physarum polycephalum & Probiotics Christy Freeman BIO 152 LAB 801 August 2 nd , 2017 1
Christy Freeman BIO 152 LAB 801 Slime Mold Physarum polycephalum , commonly referred to as slime mold, is a widely-studied organism. Due to its reliance on reproductive spores, it was once considered a fungus. However, due to its molecular composition and growth processes, it has since been classified as a protist (Sandgren et al. 2013). Physarum polycephalum are plasmodial – their contents are enclosed in a single membrane. Slime mold can be envisioned as one large cell comprised of cytoplasm and thousands of nuclei. They are phagotrophic; slime molds eat substances by engulfing them. Bacteria are their primary food source, as they eat their way through forest soil and rotting logs (Sandgren et al. 2013). Physarum polycephalum obtain nutrients from sources in addition to bacteria. Protein and sugars (carbohydrates) also contribute to their diet. Varying concentrations of nutrients contribute to fluctuating growth patterns. This has become a topic of much experimentation (Dussutour et al. 2010). The purpose of the slime mold experiment was to explore the food choices of Physarum polycephalum . Oats are known to be well-received by Physarum polycephalum and therefore served as my control. I hypothesized that Physarum polycephalum

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