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Comparison Paper Travonna Thompson-Wiley GOVT 200, L29003724, D07
United States Constitution and The Declaration of Independence “The Declaration of Independence and the Constitution of the United States are the two most important, and enduring documents in our Nation’s history. It has been said that the Declaration of Independence was the promise; the Constitution was the fulfillment” (U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, 2008) It has been more than 200 years since our Founding Fathers established a government based the rights of the people and upholding the law. The Declaration of Independence officially broke any political ties between the American Colonies and Great Britain. This document explained the ideas and principles behind government that fair and promotes justice, and the United States constitution explained how the government would function. The United States Constitution, The Declaration of Independence, Thomas Jefferson’s letter to the Danbury Baptists played an essential role in the founding of this nation. The Declaration of Independence was the first of the three historical documents listed above. The Declaration of Independence was signed on July 4, 1776. “The document was divided into two parts. The first offered a philosophical justification for secession, based on theory that all men are entitled to certain basic rights, that the purpose of government is to protect those rights, and that the people have the right to abolish that government if it fails to fulfill its obligations….The second part of the document, Jefferson presented a long list of grievances against the King and Parliament, including those contained in the 1774 Declaration, to demonstrate the many ways in which the government had endeavored to establish an absolute Tyranny over those States” (McClellan, 2000). This document explained to the King George III that the thirteen colonies would no longer be under the rule of Great Britain. The Declaration of Independence listed the actions and conduct of King George III that the colonists would no longer allow. For example, the colonists were expected house and feed British officers, trade

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