EECE310_Lecture_Notes__wk_of_9_19_05_

EECE310_Lecture_Notes__wk_of_9_19_05_ - College of...

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Unformatted text preview: College of Engineering, Architecture, and Computer Sciences Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Chapter 2-DC Circuits The Mesh-Current (Mesh) Analysis is an excellent procedure to use when the node voltages are unknown. This technique can be applied to any network. To apply the methodology, the following steps must be taken: 1) Isolate the circuit into separate meshes. 2) Label the meshes as current variables. 3) Use KVL and Ohm's Law to determine the voltage across each element. EECE 310 Preston D. Frazier, Ph.D., P.E., PMP College of Engineering, Architecture, and Computer Sciences Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Chapter 2-DC Circuits Important Mesh Analysis Note: When a current source exists in a branch between two meshes, the current source and the two meshes can be written as a supermesh. I1 I2 = IS EECE 310 Preston D. Frazier, Ph.D., P.E., PMP College of Engineering, Architecture, and Computer Sciences Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Chapter 2-DC Circuits EECE 310 Preston D. Frazier, Ph.D., P.E., PMP College of Engineering, Architecture, and Computer Sciences Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Chapter 2-DC Circuits The Principle of Superposition states: In any linear circuit containing multiple independent sources, the current (i) and voltage (v) at any point in the network may be calculated as the algebraic sum of the individual contributions of each source acting alone. EECE 310 Preston D. Frazier, Ph.D., P.E., PMP College of Engineering, Architecture, and Computer Sciences Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Chapter 2-DC Circuits Thevenin's Theorem states: An entire network can be replaced, exclusive of the load (RL), by an equivalent circuit containing only an independent voltage source (VTH) in series with a resistor (RTH) in such a way that the current-voltage relationship at the load is unchanged. EECE 310 Preston D. Frazier, Ph.D., P.E., PMP College of Engineering, Architecture, and Computer Sciences Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Chapter 2-DC Circuits Thevenin's Theorem may be applied by implementing the following steps: 1) Remove the load (RL). 2) Determine the open circuit voltage (VOC). 3) Calculate the Thevenin's equivalent voltage (VTH). 4) Discover the Thevenin's equivalent resistance (RTH). 5) Draw Thevenin's equivalent circuit and solve for the unknown parameter. EECE 310 Preston D. Frazier, Ph.D., P.E., PMP College of Engineering, Architecture, and Computer Sciences Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Chapter 2-DC Circuits Important Thevenin's Theorem Note: Before calculating Thevenin's equivalent resistance (RTH), any voltage sources in the original circuit must be removed and shorted and any current sources in the original circuit must be removed and left open. EECE 310 Preston D. Frazier, Ph.D., P.E., PMP College of Engineering, Architecture, and Computer Sciences Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Chapter 2-DC Circuits Norton's Theorem states: An entire network can be replaced, exclusive of the load (RL), by an equivalent circuit containing only an independent current source (IN) in parallel with a resistor (RN) in such a way that the current-voltage relationship at the load is unchanged. EECE 310 Preston D. Frazier, Ph.D., P.E., PMP College of Engineering, Architecture, and Computer Sciences Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Chapter 2-DC Circuits Important Circuit Analysis Note: Current travels the path of least resistance, any circuit elements connected in parallel with a short will have no current flow through them. These elements will have voltage valued at zero. EECE 310 Preston D. Frazier, Ph.D., P.E., PMP ...
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This note was uploaded on 10/15/2008 for the course EECE 310 taught by Professor Frazier during the Fall '08 term at Howard.

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