chinese earthquake - Just-in-Time Lecture...

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/www.pitt.edu/~super Just-in-Time Lecture China Earthquake: China Earthquake: 12 May 2008 12 May 2008
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The Global Disaster Health Network is designed to translate the best possible scholarly information to educators worldwide. What are the Disaster Supercourse & JIT lecture? Mission Statement
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What is the Disaster Supercourse? What is a JIT lecture? http://www.pitt.edu/~super1
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Lecture objectives      To provide the best possible scientific     information about the China      earthquake, 12 May 2008  To teach how the science can help      Chinese to be prepared for primary &     secondary prevention of consequences of     earthquake
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Lecture Objectives In this lecture you will find:  How the vulnerability conditions can change      a natural hazard to a disaster?
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?What is the Earthquake The shaking of earth caused by waves moving on and below the earth's surface and causing: surface faulting, tremors vibration, liquefaction, landslides, aftershocks and/or tsunamis.
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How Earthquake Happens? It caused by a sudden slip on a FAULT . Stresses in the earth's outer layer push sides of fault together. Stress builds up & rocks slips suddenly, releasing energy in waves that travel through the earth's CRUST & cause the shaking that we Feel during an earthquake.
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I) Magnitude: Definition: A measure of actual physical energy release at its source as estimated from instrumental observations. Scale: Richter Scale By Charles Richter, 1936 Open-ended scale The oldest & most widely used Noji 1997 Earthquake Strength Measures I) Magnitude & II) Intensity
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II) Intensity: Definition: a measure of the felt or perceived effects of an earthquake rather than the strength of the earthquake itself. Scale: Modified Mercalli (MM) scale 12-point scale, ranges from barely perceptible earthquakes at MM I to near total destruction at MM XII Earthquake Strength Measures I) Magnitude & II) Intensity
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Magnitude refers to the force of the earthquake as a whole, while intensity refers to the effects of an earthquake at a particular site. An earthquake can have just one magnitude, while intensity is usually strongest close to the epicenter & is weaker the farther a site is from the epicenter. The intensity of an earthquake is more germane to its public health consequences than its magnitude.
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This note was uploaded on 10/16/2008 for the course PHYSICAL G 101 taught by Professor F during the Spring '08 term at E. Stroudsburg.

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chinese earthquake - Just-in-Time Lecture...

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