exp03 - 1 Electronic Instrumentation Experiment 3 Part A...

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05/11/09 1 Electronic Instrumentation Experiment 3 Part A: Making an Inductor Part B: Measurement of Inductance Part C: Simulation of a Transformer Part D: Making a Transformer
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05/11/09 Electronic Instrumentation 2 Inductors & Transformers How do transformers work? How to make an inductor? How to measure inductance? How to make a transformer? ?
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05/11/09 Electronic Instrumentation 3 Part A Inductors Review Calculating Inductance Calculating Resistance
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05/11/09 Electronic Instrumentation 4 Inductors-Review General form of I-V relationship For steady-state sine wave excitation V L d I d t = V j L I = ϖ Z j L L = ϖ
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05/11/09 Electronic Instrumentation 5 Determining Inductance Calculate it from dimensions and material properties Measure using commercial bridge (expensive device) Infer inductance from response of a circuit. This latter approach is the cheapest and usually the simplest to apply. Most of the time, we can determine circuit parameters from circuit performance.
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05/11/09 Electronic Instrumentation 6 Making an Inductor For a simple cylindrical inductor (called a solenoid), we wind N turns of wire around a cylindrical form. The inductance is ideally given by where this expression only holds when the length d is very much greater than the diameter 2r c Henries d r N L c ) ( 2 2 0 π μ =
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05/11/09 Electronic Instrumentation 7 Making an Inductor Note that the constant μ o = 4 π x 10 -7 H/m is required to have inductance in Henries (named after Joseph Henry of Albany) For magnetic materials, we use instead, which can typically be 10 5 times larger for materials like iron is called the permeability
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05/11/09 Electronic Instrumentation 8 Some Typical Permeabilities Air 1.257x10 -6 H/m Ferrite U M33 9.42x10 -4 H/m Nickel 7.54x10 -4 H/m Iron 6.28x10 -3 H/m Ferrite T38 1.26x10 -2 H/m Silicon GO steel 5.03x10 -2 H/m supermalloy 1.26 H/m
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05/11/09 Electronic Instrumentation 9 Making an Inductor If the coil length is much smaller than the diameter ( r w is the wire radius) Such a coil is used in the metal detector at the right } 2 ) 8 {ln( 2 - 2245 w c c r r r N L μ
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05/11/09 Electronic Instrumentation 10 Calculating Resistance All wires have some finite resistance. Much of the
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This note was uploaded on 10/16/2008 for the course ENGR 2250 taught by Professor Borca-tasciuc during the Spring '08 term at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

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exp03 - 1 Electronic Instrumentation Experiment 3 Part A...

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