Dissonance_theory - Feb21Dissonancetheory

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This is the first post-decision dissonance study, by Brehm in 1956. Dissonance reduction is here shown by a “spreading apart” of the attractiveness of the chosen and rejected alternatives (rating of the chosen goes up, rejected goes down) after making a hard decision. Feb 21--Dissonance theory
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At Pimlico racetrack, people were asked either just before or just after they placed their bet (and thus became irrevocably committed to their decision) to indicate on this scale how good a chance their horse had of winning the upcoming race. You see a very large shift in attitude after a very small amount of time.
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Conceptually very similar to the racetrack study on the previous slide, this shows a similar immediate post-decisional (in this case, meaning post-voting) shift in the subjective likelihood that the preferred candidate will win. This isn’t due to a simple good mood being induced by voting; if that were the case, we’d expect ratings of the beauty of the fall foliage to go up too, but they do not.
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What’s key in this slide is the top half of the data. Chronic amnesiacs (who don’t remember which were the prints they chose between) nevertheless, just like non-amnesic controls, spread the chosen
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This note was uploaded on 10/17/2008 for the course PSYCH 2800 taught by Professor Gilovich,t/regan,d during the Spring '08 term at Cornell University (Engineering School).

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Dissonance_theory - Feb21Dissonancetheory

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