Ag Econ 201 Paper

Ag Econ 201 Paper - Preparing for Change with RFID Jessica...

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Preparing for Change with RFID Jessica L. Lester Agriculture Economics 201 Final Paper November 23, 2004 Preparing for Change with RFID
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Radio Frequency Identification (RFDI), also known as electronic identification (EID), is at the heart of many programs that aim to add value for producers and consumers alike. The Montana Beef Network utilizes EID to individually track certified feeder calves through industry segments. When applied in the Montana Beef Network, RFDI is being used as a quick way of identifying animals and moving data. In 2003, the MBN certified more than 10,000 calves for 52 participating producers, all BQA-certified. Ranchers who use this system seem to all have the same one question, “Do I have the kind of cattle the customer the customer is looking for?” In order to answer this, EID is the tool used by MBN to collect individual animal performance starting at the ranch and ending at the packer. The industry is quickly changing and through, through MBN, Montana is helping position its producers for a more information-driven marketplace. Industry leaders believe that cattle feeders will buy cattle destined for branded programs like Certified Hereford Beef (CHB), Certified Angus Beef (CAB),- or even McDonald’s. McDonald’s is looking for source and process verification. Given the ease of transmission and speed at which it can move information up and down the supply chain, electronic technology is also the identification method of choice for the national animal ID program. National ID is only for disease trace back. But there could be spin- offs with the technology. For both seedstock and commercial cow-calf operations, “spin-offs” could be 1
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computerized record-keeping systems that track herd health and performance individually in order to better measure and modify genetics, and production and management practices. The EID tag could serve as a “shared” device, serving both National ID and herd data collection and reporting purposes. EID offers a way to trade pencil-and-paper record-keeping systems for quicker, more efficient computerized systems. This automation lends to overall efficiency and profitability, while data is easily shared within and between industry segments. With these thoughts in mind, what follows is a basic introduction to electronic technology: what is it, how it works and how to get started. What is RFID? Not a new technology, RFDI in food animals debuted in the 1980’s as molded neck collars marketed for dairy and feeding applications. Today, the most common RFDI device for beef cattle is a button tag about the size of a quarter. RFDI uses low frequency radio transmission to send a signal between the ID device attached to the animal (tag) and the reading device or antenna. The electronic ear tag, itself, does not store information. Its purpose is to electronically verify an animal’s unique identification number. RFDI technology associated with beef cattle production is what’s known as “passive”.
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This note was uploaded on 10/18/2008 for the course AGEC 402 taught by Professor Bertrand during the Spring '08 term at McNeese.

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Ag Econ 201 Paper - Preparing for Change with RFID Jessica...

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