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HP Network Design PrinciplesVersion 10.41
©Copyright 2010 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.The information contained herein is subject to change without notice. The only warranties for HP productsand services are set forth in the express warranty statements accompanying such products and services.Nothing herein should be construed as constituting an additional warranty. HP shall not be liable fortechnical or editorial errors or omissions contained herein. This is an HP copyrighted work that may not bereproduced without the written permission of HP. You may not use these materials to deliver training to anyperson outside of your organization without the written permission of HP.HP Network Design PrinciplesRev. 10.41
Rev. 10.411ContentsModule 1: LAN DesignLogical Layout1-1Link Design1-4VLAN Design1-6Redundancy1-10Module 2: IPv4 DesignIntroduction2-1Subnet and IP Address Planning2-1IP Routing Planning2-6Module 3: Multicast DesignIntroduction3-1IGMP3-1IGMP Snooping3-2Multicast VLAN3-2Multicast Routing – PIM3-2Module 4: QoS DesignIntroduction – LAN QoS4-1Prioritization in A-Series Switches4-4QoS Policies in A-Series Switches4-6LAN Prioritization Design4-7Using QoS Policies for Diagnostics4-8
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Rev. 10.411 – 1LAN DesignModule 1Logical LayoutThe design of local area networks has evolved into a small number oflogical layoutmodelsbased on a single- or dual-root tree. Thelogical layoutwill be conditionedby thephysical layout, in other words, by the physical distribution of clientworkstations: a single-story building, a multi-story building or a campus, but ingeneral, these models will apply.Two Tier LAN ModelsIn these models, all servers are connected directly to a switching layer called theCore Layer. This core layer can be composed by one or two interconnectedswitches, depending on the level of redundancy required.A second layer of switching is used to connect all clients and is called either theAccess Layer. The set of all access switches is sometimes called theEdge. In thecase of a single switch core (Figure 1.1), each access switch is directly connected tothis core switch and in the case of a core with two interconnected switches (Figure1.2), each access switch is connected to each of them (dual-homed).Figure 1.1: Two Tier / Single RootFigure 1.2: Two Tier / Dual Root
HP Network Design Principles1 – 2Rev. 10.41These models are mostly used when designing a single building network like inFigure 1.3.Figure 1.3 – Single Building LANThree Tier LAN ModelsIn the case of campuses, the topology (layout model) of each building is composedby two switching layers, but all the servers are located in a dedicated facility (serverroom).

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