ch13 - Chapter 13 MS-DOS Operating System Understanding...

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Chapter 13 MS-DOS Operating System Understanding Operating Systems, Fourth Edition
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Understanding Operating Systems, Fourth Edition 2 Objectives Objectives You should be able to describe: The historical significance of MS-DOS How MS-DOS provided a foundation for early Microsoft Windows releases The basics of command-driven systems and how to construct simple batch files How one processor can be shared among multiple processes The limitations of MS-DOS for many of today’s computer users
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Understanding Operating Systems, Fourth Edition 3 MS-DOS Operating System MS-DOS Operating System Developed to run single-user, stand-alone desktop computers Manages jobs sequentially from a single user Advantages: Fundamental operation Straightforward user commands Disadvantages: Lack of flexibility Limited ability to meet the needs of programmers and experienced users
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Understanding Operating Systems, Fourth Edition 4 History History MS-DOS was successor of CP/M operating system that ran first PC Microsoft discovered an innovative operating system, called 86-DOS, designed by Tim Patterson of Seattle Computer Products Microsoft bought it, renamed it MS-DOS, and made it available to IBM IBM chose MS-DOS in 1981, called it PC-DOS, and proclaimed it the standard for their line of PCs
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Understanding Operating Systems, Fourth Edition 5 History History (continued) (continued) MS-DOS became standard operating system for most 16-bit personal computers Each version of MS-DOS is a standard version Later versions are compatible with earlier versions Early versions of Windows (versions 1.0 through 3.1) were merely GUIs that ran on top of the MS- DOS operating system Although MS-DOS is no longer widely used, many Windows OSs offer a DOS emulator
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Understanding Operating Systems, Fourth Edition 6 History History (continued) (continued) Table 13.1: The evolution of MS-DOS
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Understanding Operating Systems, Fourth Edition 7 Design Goals Design Goals Designed to accommodate single novice user in single-process environment Standard I/O support includes keyboard, monitor, printer, and secondary storage unit User commands are based on English words or phrases, interpreted by command processor Layering approach is fundamental to design of the whole MS-DOS system
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Understanding Operating Systems, Fourth Edition 8 Design Goals Design Goals (continued) (continued) Figure 13.2: The three layers of MS-DOS
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Understanding Operating Systems, Fourth Edition 9 Design Goals Design Goals (continued) (continued) BIOS (Basic Input/Output System): Interfaces directly with various I/O devices Contains device drivers that control flow of data to and from each device except disk drives Receives status information of each I/O operation and passes it on to processor Takes care of small differences among I/O units Example: Allows user to purchase a printer from any manufacturer without having to write a device driver
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This note was uploaded on 10/20/2008 for the course IST 341 taught by Professor Woldering during the Fall '08 term at Cleveland State.

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ch13 - Chapter 13 MS-DOS Operating System Understanding...

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