Summer work 1776.docx - Honors English 2 August 21st 2016...

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Honors English 2August 21st 2016K-HornPeriod 5Green, Lee and Knox’s effect on Outcome of WarDavid McCullough’s 1776is an enticing historic account of the revolutionary war between the American colonists and the British Empire. The account proves General George Washington's decisions were the most significant in the Americans’ victorious outcome of the war. Many of Washington’s decisions were greatly influenced or aided by his fellow officers Nathanael Greene, Charles Lee, and Henry Knox, however they were not all in the same way. Henry Knox, by far, was one of the biggest contributor to Washington's success and overall victory. Before joining the continental army, he was a clerk in a Boston bookstore. He was quite fond of history and reading. As he started to support the American movement more and more, his interests settled on artillery. He; eventually, became a volunteer for The Battle of Bunker Hill under the command ofGeneral Ward. Soon after the Battle, Washington arrived in Boston, taking over command of the army. Washington; eventually, became close friends with Knox and commissioned him to be a colonel, head of artillery. He was assigned the task of capturing and stealing cannon from Fort Ticonderoga. Later, Washington would use these cannon to ultimately win the battle over Boston. “In March 1776, Washingtonseized Dorchester Heights (the key to Boston) and Knox placed the cannon in position there. Howe, realizing the danger of an impending American bombardment, withdrew his troops from the city”(General Henry Knox). If Knox had not successfully captured the cannon from Fort Ticonderoga, Washington wouldnot have posed any major threat to the British and they very well might have stayed in Boston. Knox’s contribution was crucial to Washington’s victory. Later during the war on December 25, 1776, Knox again played a crucial role during the crossing of the Delaware River in what ultimately might have been the deciding battle of the entire war. Knox had been entrusted with organizing and directing the crossing which included moving eighteen field cannon and around 50 horses across the freezing river. The weather was harsh the night of crossing. Henry Knox wrote to his wife, “the night was cold & stormy It
hailed with great violence.” (McCullough 273 ). A soldier would later say, “had it not been for the powerful

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