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Lab 3 - Jonathan Mahaffie LING 450 Lab 3 10 15 08...

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Jonathan Mahaffie LING 450 Lab 3 10 / 15 / 08 Monophthong vowels in English: /ɪ/, /i/, /eɪ/, sometimes /e/, /ɛ/, /æ/, /ɑ/, /ɔ/, /oʊ/, sometimes /o/, /ʊ/, /u/, /ʌ/, /ɜ/ (I don’t know) Basque (Basque family): Basque, like Spanish for most speakers, has a very simple pure 5 vowel system: /i/, /e/, /a/, /o/, and /u/ Georgian (Kartvellian family): Georgian also has a very limited vowel system /i/, /ɛ/, /u/, /ɔ/, and /ɑ/ Russian (Indo-European – Eastern Slavic): Many of the allophonic variations in Russian depend on placement of stress within words and palatization. /i/, sometimes /ɨ/ /e/, /ɑ/, /o/, /u/, and /ə/. Finnish (Uralic – Finno-Ugric): Since vowels play an important grammatical and lexical role in Finnish words, there is almost no allophony in the 8 vowels. /i/, /e/, /æ/, /y/, /ø/, /ɑ/, /u/, and /o/ Indonesian (Austronesian): Indonesian also has the diphthongs /ai/, /au/, and /oi. /i/, /e/ or /ɜ/, /ə/, /a/, /u/, /o/ or /ɔ/. Arabic (Afro-Asiatic – Semitic): Arabic only has three vowels, with long and short forms of /a/, /i/ and /u/. Arabic also has two diphthongs, /aw/ and /aw/.
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