LabReport_2

LabReport_2 - Differences in the Water Potential of Sweet...

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Differences in the Water Potential of Sweet and White Potatoes By Abstract There are many differences in sweet and white potatoes. We compared the water potentials of the sweet potato and white potato plants and found that these, also are very different. We cored samples of potatoes, placed them in sucrose solution of varying molality and allowed them to stand for 2 hours. The potatoes either gained or lost water due to osmosis. After sitting, we weighed the potatoes and did some calculations to find the average water potential of each type of potato. The water potential of the sweet potatoes was an average of -17.9 bars compared to the average water potential of the white potatoes which was -7.7 bars. We did an unpaired median test to see if our results occurred by chance alone, but the results seem to support a difference in water potential of the two plants. Introduction Burton (1989 Chapter 1) stated that sweet potatoes and white potatoes produce the edible part of the potato in different ways. The potato part of the sweet potato is in actuality its root, while the potato part of the white potato is a starchy stem (Hand and Cockerham, 1921, Burton, 1989, Chapter 2 ). Our hypothesis was that sweet potatoes would have a more negative water potential do to higher levels of carbohydrates and lower levels of water than white potatoes. When solute concentrations are higher, water potential is more negative. Because sweet potatoes have higher levels of carbohydrates than white potatoes, they should have lower water potentials (Hand and Cockerham, 1921). This means that water is more likely to move into the cells to create equilibrium concentrations inside and outside of the cells. This can also be supported by the evidence that the potato part of the sweet potato is really a root. Roots typically have lower water
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This note was uploaded on 10/21/2008 for the course BIOL 110 taught by Professor Kosinski during the Fall '06 term at Clemson.

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LabReport_2 - Differences in the Water Potential of Sweet...

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