Crisis Intervention Reflection final.docx - Running head CRISIS INTERVENTION REFLECTION 1 Crisis Intervention Reflection Burnout Compassion Fatigue and

Crisis Intervention Reflection final.docx - Running head...

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Running head: CRISIS INTERVENTION REFLECTION 1 Crisis Intervention Reflection: Burnout, Compassion Fatigue, and Vicarious Traumatization Kaitlyn O'Connor University of Holy Cross As every person is unique, every crisis is unique to the individual; therefore, everyone has a different definition for crisis . According to James and Gilliland (2013), the term crisis has multiple definitions, but a summarizing definition of an individual crisis is: a person’s experience with an event that is perceived as intolerably difficult to cope with for the person. The role of the crisis interventionist is to aid an individual who perceives intolerable emotional distress from an event by working with the client to identify the problem and find solutions in a safe environment (James & Gilliland, 2013). While the goal of crisis intervention is to aid the client from moving out of distress, the counselor or interventionist who works with multiple crisis victims may experience negative emotions hindering their ability to be an effective counselor (Culver, McKinney, & Paradise, 2011). A good interventionist recognizes his/her own abilities and emotions that may impact crisis work. The interventionist shows empathetic understanding with the victim while remaining calm during and after the crisis. As a counselor I will work with victims of crisis, and as a school counselor I will see different types of crises every day. James and Gilliland (2013) write that a good crisis interventionist is empathetic, calm, creative, and mature. I believe I possess these qualities and will continue to grow in them. Children with Asperger’s have been a large part of my life. I cannot go anywhere without a child on the autism spectrum nearby. Growing up my best friend was diagnosed with Asperger’s, and children had a tendency to pick on him. No one had the ability to calm him during episodes of anger except me. From ages two to fourteen his parents made sure we were in the same class, because they feared what would happen if I was not around. In third grade they briefly moved to northern Louisiana, but after one month had to return because of his
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CRISIS INTERVENTION REFLECTION 2 behavior. Recently I asked both my friend and his mother what influence I had over him. They responded that I was genuine and have a calming presence. Personally, I think my calming presence may be due to the fact that I am always tired, but it helped him. I have a calming presence apparently, which makes people want to talk to me. Where ever I go random people feel that they can express themselves to me. A certain level of experience is needed in crisis intervention, which aids the interventionist in maturity (James & Gilliland, 2013). My experiences with crisis have mostly been trauma in my life or hearing about the traumas of others. I used to tutor a teenage girl, who witnessed her mother being killed during a home invasion one morning when she was younger.
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