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SY281 OC ONLINE MIDTERM – SATURDAY FEBRUARY 11TH@ 12 -2PM-20%LESSONS 1-4 – CHAPTER 1-8Week #1 (Jan 6-9)1. InterpretiveSociologyLofland, introductionWeek #2 (Jan 10-16)2. Field WorkLofland, Chapters 1-5Week #3 (Jan 17-23)3. Qualitative AnalysisLofland, chapters 6-8Week #4 (Jan 24-30)4. Ethics in ResearchLofland, pages 26-30, 31-35, 41-44, 63-64Four of these questions will appear on the midterm of which you will have to answer three. Each question isof equal value.4. Discuss thedifferent types of roles and sociological relationships involved in participant observation1.How does themethodology of participant observation influence the development of sociological theory3.Outline and discuss thesocial skills needed for participant observation6. Outline and discuss therelationship between sociological theory and participant observation*2. Outline and discuss thecharacteristics of an interpretive sociology. Discuss the implications of thesecharacteristics for sociological research.5. How do the"thinking topics" of Lofland et al.help us to analyze the data of field work? In your answer,refer to the topics and to the aspects of the topics.7. Outline and discuss theprocess of "asking questions" as presented by Lofland et al.. How do we generateinterest in the research process?8. Outline and discuss therole of ethics in sociological research.How do ethical considerations influence theconduct of sociological research??..
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Chapter 12 / Exercise 17
A History of Modern Psychology
Schultz/Schultz
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Naturalistic studies (chapter 3) ethical researchThe process of deciding what is interesting to study and whether you can gainethical accessto appropriatesettings may involve conversations and consultations with others, but the decisions themselves are personal.When a decision is translated into action, when your intention to do research is translated into beginning thatresearch, the you encounter the first truly social moment ofnaturalistic investigation: getting in and gaining theacceptance of the people being studied.It is one thing to decide for yourself about interest, appropriateness, accessibility and ethics, it is quite anotherto get all the relevant parties to go along with your plan.Innaturalistic field studies, the researcher does not exercise the control of power over the research subjects. Inthis tradition, you look at and/ or listen to people either because the people freely agree to it or because they donot know they are being studied. Since there is little or nothing to stop them from refusing to be interviewed,from denying an observer entry into their lives or from throwing out or shutting out secret investigator who is“uncovered”, getting in is of understandable concern to all potential field researchers.The specific type of relationship a prospective investigator has or will develop with the people or setting ofinterest generates its own set of problems, ethical questions, and solutions regarding the process of entry.Investigative roles field researchers might assume:oTypes of settingsoThe unknown InvestigatorPublic and Quasi Public SettingsPrivate and Quasi Private settingsoThe Known investigatorThe ‘Insider’ Participant Researcher RoleThe insider has the advantage of already knowing the “cast of characters” or at least asegment of. While the outside researcher must discover whom to ask or tell first,weather formal permission is required, etc. to the insider participant researcher such

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A History of Modern Psychology
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Chapter 12 / Exercise 17
A History of Modern Psychology
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