Lecture+11+Ice,+Wind - Lecture11Ice,Wind

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Lecture 11 Ice, Wind
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In the space of one hundred and seventy-six years the Lower Mississippi has shortened itself two hundred and forty-two miles. That is an average of a trifle over one mile and a third per year. Therefore, any calm person, who is not blind or idiotic, can see that in the Old Oolitic Silurian Period, just a million years ago next November, the Lower Mississippi River was upwards of one million three hundred thousand miles long, and stuck out over the Gulf of Mexico like a fishing-rod. And by the same token any person can see that seven hundred and forty-two years from now the Lower Mississippi will be only a mile and three-quarters long, and Cairo and New Orleans will have joined their streets together, and be plodding comfortably along under a single mayor and a mutual board of aldermen. There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact. - Life on the Mississippi Mark Twain
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Running water Drainage patterns Networks of streams that from distinctive patterns Types of drainage patterns Dendritic Radial Rectangular Trellis
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Drainage patterns Figure 5.20
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Running water Floods and flood control Floods are the most common geologic hazard Causes of floods Weather Human interference with the stream system
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Running water Floods and flood control Engineering efforts Artificial levees Flood-control dams Channelization Nonstructural approach through sound floodplain management
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Satellite view of the Missouri River flowing into the Mississippi River near St. Louis
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Same satellite view during flooding in 1993
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Water beneath the surface (groundwater) Largest freshwater reservoir for humans Geological roles As an erosional agent, dissolving by ground- water produces Sinkholes Caverns An equalizer of stream flow
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Water beneath the surface (groundwater) Distribution and movement of groundwater Distribution of groundwater Belt of soil moisture Zone of aeration Unsaturated zone Pore spaces in the material are filled mainly with air
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This note was uploaded on 10/22/2008 for the course EAS 2600 taught by Professor Ingalls during the Fall '08 term at Georgia Institute of Technology.

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Lecture+11+Ice,+Wind - Lecture11Ice,Wind

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